Minnesota billionaires listed by Forbes

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Let's consider trading places.
This news makes us want to go out and rent "Trading Places" all over again.

Forbes is out with its list of the world's most wildly wealthy tycoons. Itfigures there are 1,210 billionaires in the world, worth a total of $4.5 trillion -- a figure that beats the gross domestic product for Japan.

Six of those folks call Minnesota home.

Taken together, the combined net worth of the top two Minnesotan's alone would be would more than enough to pay off the state's $5.8 billion budget shortfall.

Not that they should. We're just sayin'.

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Witney MacMilllan
No. 223 -- Whitney MacMillan.

His $4.7 billion springs from an 88 percent stake in family-owned Cargill, the largest privately-held company in the world. Cargill controls about 25 percent of the entire world's grain production. MacMillan, 81, stepped down as CEO in 1995. He lives in Minneapolis.

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Richard Schulze
No. 459 -- Richard Schulze.

This is the man without a college degree who founded a little stereo and electronics store, turned it into Best Buy, and took it public in 1985. The Edina resident worth $2.5 billion now. He stepped down as Best Buy's chief executive in 2002.

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Glen Taylor
No. 540: Glen Taylor.

A farm kid who learned the printing trade as he worked his way through college, and who still lives in Mankato, Taylor owns 98 percent of Taylor Corp., a hugely successful commercial printing, packaging and marketing company. He's worth $2.2 billion, which must be nice. Downside: Taylor owns the Minnesota Timberwolves, which proves that money can buy a lot, but not a winning NBA team.

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Stanley Hubbard
No. 651 -- Stanley Hubbard.

Minnesota's very own media mogul, and a major Republican donor, Stanley Hubbard was the driving force behind KSTP-TV, which he started after World War II, and KSTP-AM and KSTP-FM. Hubbard Broadcasting now owns a dozen TV stations in Minnesota, Wisconsin, Iowa, New Mexico and New York. Last year, the company also bought 17 radio stations from Bonneville International. Stanley Hubbard, 77, who lives in St. Paul, is worth $1.9 billion.

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Barbara Carlson Gage
No. 782, Barbara Carlson Gage and Marilyn Carlson Nelson.

The Carlson women's fortune comes courtesy of their father Curt, who founded the Gold Bond Stamp company and eventually transformed it into the Carlson Cos., based in Minnetonka. Ever sleep at a Radisson? Ever eat at T.G.I.Friday's? Both are part of Carlson's international empire of hospitality and travel holdings. Marilyn took over as CEO from her father, but stepped down in 2008. Barbara is president of the family's foundation. They're each worth $1.6 billion.

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Marilyn Carlson Nelson
How do our homegrown billionaires stack up compared to the really rich people? Telecom magnate Carlos Slim Helu, born, raised and educated in Mexico, tops the Forbes list with a net worth of $20.5 billion. (He own's a serious chunk of the New York Times.) Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates came in second with $18 billion.

How does Forbes figure this stuff out? With an army of 50 reporters in 13 countries who try to poke into each person's assets -- everything from stock holdings to yachts.

Looking good!


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2 comments
Dethrusch
Dethrusch

Just as the correct conjugation of "to own" in singular third-person present tense is "owns," not "own's."

Gene
Gene

The plural of "Minnesotan" is "Minnesotans," not "Minnesotan's."

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