Jack Jablonski Miracle on Ice: Winning Chuck-a-Puck #13 thrown by player who hit him

Categories: Sports
Jabs.jpg
Jack Jablonski, the paralyzed teen hockey player who wore #13, may have inspired his own miracle on ice.

Two unbelievable coincidences occurred during last weekend's Blaine-Wayzata high school hockey game. As is often the case in high school hockey, the game featured a "Chuck-a-Puck" event. Spectators buy a numbered puck, then throw the puck on the ice in between periods. The puck that ends up closest to the center dot wins, and that person gets a cut of the puck sales.

The winning puck turned out to be #13, and you won't believe who threw it.

Wayzata's JV hockey team, you might recall, was playing Benilde-St. Margaret's JV team when Benilde sophomore Jack Jablonski was checked into the boards from behind, severing his spinal cord and fracturing two vertebrae. Doctors have since said they doubt "Jabs" will walk again.

Fittingly, proceeds from the Blaine-Wayzata puck toss were to be given to Jablonski's family.

Blaine-resident Mark Nowicki organized the puck throw. He said the reason Blaine hockey boosters selected last weekend for the Jabs benefit is because Blaine parents wanted to show the Wayzata players and parents that "everyone is in this together."

"We wanted to reach out and say, 'hey, we feel your grief and pain,'" Nowicki said.

So the puck toss proceeded during one of the period breaks, and what do you know? Jablonski's No. 13 happened to be emblazoned on the winning puck. Kind of strange, right? Sure, but not as strange as what happened next.

Nowicki had to find out who tossed the winning puck. There were around 160 pucks strewn on the ice -- a higher number than usual, thanks to the Jabs tribute -- and a chill went down his spine when he saw #13 on the puck smack-dab in the middle of the center dot.

He said he thought to himself, 'how does this happen?' But he still didn't know who threw the puck.

A few minutes later, Nowicki learned the parent of a Wayzata JV player bought the #13 puck, then gave it to someone else.

Who was that someone else? None other than the very same Wayzata player who checked Jablonski into the boards, changing both of their lives forever.

Nowicki said: "It was a great thing. It really just ties the whole story together."

Perhaps it was meant to be. Either that or it's a very unlikely coincidence. But as far as Nowicki is concerned, the combination of hard-to-believe circumstances indicates a "greater power" was watching over that puck toss.

The Wayzata player later reclaimed the winning puck and plans to give it to Jabs in person. Understandably, he has reportedly been feeling quite bad about what happened to Jabs, and by all accounts there was no maliciousness involved in the paralyzing hit.

"I really feel bad for that kid," Nowicki said. "It wasn't a bad hit -- it was a fluke thing and he's having a hard time with it."

In total, the event raised $1,246 for Jablonski's family. For his winning effort, the Wayzata player took home about $200 himself.

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22 comments
Claudialacy1
Claudialacy1

A check from behind is a check from behind.  A check from behind is like a punch in the face. They are malicious acts.  You may not know the severity of the outcome, but it's a malicious act none the less.  Of course the Wayzata boy did not intend to sever #13 spinal cord....It's called CONSEQUENCES .  Some mistakes are much worse than others. There are lots and lots of victims here.  Hockey has got to change.  It's simply out of control and there is very little accountability.  Lacy/Minnetrista

iactuallyplayhockey
iactuallyplayhockey

You clearly have no idea what you're talking about, and you, yourself have no place in hockey.

Steffens
Steffens

This story is getting way too much attention. With three shootings in Minneapolis in the last week, it's hard to believe that this should take priority. Before I'm hailed as a pariah, I know the kids injury is terrible but if this interest was taken in the gang violence in the inner city who knows what kind of changes could occur.

Guy
Guy

Well, you can't just dictate which stories will move the masses. There are very real reasons for why this story attracts more attention than gang-related violence. The people who are most affected by gang-related violence generally aren't big consumers of news media, so news outlets aren't really feeling any sort of demand to cover those stories. And middle-to-upper-class parents with kids who play sports make up a very large chunk of news consumers. And then when you factor in the idea that many victims of inner city violence have a criminal record 15 pages long, it's not hard to see why this story attracts more attention. You're not a pariah, though. Your raise a good point.

to
to

agreed.  The chicks injury is not actually the same.  Seems she is jumping on the band wagon. 

to
to

before you know it there will be some kind of legislation to save the day regarding hockey.  you know like calling contact sports a "Hate Sport" or something.  I know we can all play ringette. or girls hockey, oh wait...

Mark
Mark

Miracles don't always have to be huge and mind blowing!  Very cool!

Pele
Pele

and coincidences don't have to be miracles.  No reason to see magic in statistical probability.  These puck events happen for injured players all the time across the country, yet this seems to be the only 'miracle' example.  What, the other injured just aren't worthy? 

HurdyGurdy
HurdyGurdy

This isn't really the place for the cynical sword of athiesm. I myself don't believe in gods, but no one is saying that some divine person nudged the puck to the center with an invisible finger. No gods isn't equal to no mystery, and sometimes wonderfully intriguing and special events occur without explanation, and they just seem right. It's safe to leave it at that, especially if it brings comfort to the family.

I'll agree with another poster that Jack's suffering isn't as statistically negative as gang violence and murder, but this isn't a competition of suffering. We should also leave out all the class and race issues to simply acknowledge that a child, while playing a game he enjoys, had his life drastically altered by a serious injury from which he'll never recover. No amount of starving kids or murder somewhere else makes this event insignificant.

Pele
Pele

The article's use of the term unlikely coincidence is a little redundant.  Coincidences are coincidences because they are unlikely.  It is nice to see money being raised to help this kid, though.  A great cause.

Guy
Guy

...and Lifetime's programming executives just peed in their pants a little bit.

Lily Byrlev
Lily Byrlev

perhaps the wayzata player should have then donated his winnings back to the family. that would have been the good karma thing to do.

Nick Polsfuss
Nick Polsfuss

He actually did give it all back. know your facts.

Kayleeb00
Kayleeb00

he did, he gave it to the jablonski family fundraiser,

Jvdrumsbass
Jvdrumsbass

he's a hockey player....you actually expect him to be polite?

zackb07
zackb07

No all hockey players are jerks...

Sheryl Hill
Sheryl Hill

Synchronicity - its like the divine saying, "You're forgiven" be happy.

Mike
Mike

It's Jablonski, not Joblonski as you have in the headline and lead.

Lightningkimm
Lightningkimm

Also last Friday the sixth Jenna Privvetts had the same injury and is now in the hospital . Facebook Support Jenna Privvetts!

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