Minnesota's proportion of native-born residents decreasing, says census

Categories: Notable MN
Minnesota welcome.JPG
Over the past 30 years, Minnesota has welcomed an increasing number of non-native residents.
Minnesota is a little less Minnesotan than it used to be.

Recent census data indicates that about 69 percent of state residents were born here, compared with 75 percent in 1980. Hennepin and Ramsey counties are two of the least Minnesotan areas of the state, with about 40 percent of residents in each hailing from places where pop is probably known as something called "soda."

The most Minnesotan county is Morrison, home of Little Falls, where more than 87 percent of residents are native. Houston County, situated in the state's southeast corner across from La Crosse, has the most imports, with less than 33 percent of residents hailing from here.

Before you say "who gives a flying truck?" about the census data, consider comments made by Tom Gillapsy, the newly retired state demographer.

Gillapsy told the Star Tribune he worries that the decreasing proportion of native-born residents could be eroding Minnesotans' sense of unity and community.

Comparing when he moved here 33 years ago to today, Gillapsy said:
border fence.jpg
Concerned about preserving our sense of Minnesotan-ness? How about an electrified fence separating us from No and SoDak, Sconnie, Iowa, and Canada?
There was a sense that people had roots here, a sense that there was a history and common bonds. Part of it was the weather, and going up north, and having a connection to the land. And with more and more new people here, that begins to slip away.
It's still bonding bill season, right? With our sense of Minnesotan-ness being eroded by an influx of non-Minnesotans, perhaps it's time for Governor Dayton to use the public purse strings on a Herman Cain-style electrified border fence.


Sponsor Content

My Voice Nation Help
11 comments
theoko
theoko

Well goshdarnit we'd better start producing a lot more babies in a jiff!

Erin Adler
Erin Adler

But an interesting article. I like reading anything Tom Gillaspy, the state demographer, says. He's always right but we never listen to him, and then we complain when there's not enough trained workers in a certain age group or when it becomes obvious we're not going to be able to support all the senior citizens. And then he says, "I told you so, back in 1989!" 

Erin Adler
Erin Adler

First line has a typo -- "a little less Minnesotan THAN it used to be."

DiversityinPractice
DiversityinPractice

Perhaps Minnesotans should focus more on a sense of community with people other than just other native-born Minnesotans. Learning to be inclusive of all, so we can attract the best and the brightest, and keep the locally grown talent, is important if Minnesota wants to remain a great place to live.

amiller92
amiller92

I've long been an advocate of that type of fence.  Along the Wisconsin border, that is ;)

Shanaenae
Shanaenae

Majority of incomers are actually from other Midwestern states, not immigrants. 

Jody
Jody

But see, that's the problem.....we are not attracting the best and the brightest.....we are attracting people who come here to get on MN's Welfare Bandwagon. 

Jody
Jody

Yes, and the majority of them are from the South Side of Chicago or Gary Indiana.........

theoko
theoko

Despite the complete lack of proof for your statements, I'm compelled to believe you because you keep repeating it.

S. Abdul Otherwise Himself
S. Abdul Otherwise Himself

And the statistics that prove that are where...?  Go on.  Show us.

I wasn't born here--but I moved here, got a job, built a house, pay my taxes and pump money into this economy.  You're welcome.

Now Trending

Minnesota Concert Tickets

From the Vault

 

Loading...