Mysterious, exploding poop substance killing Minnesota pigs

Categories: Animals
pig manure foam.jpg
Charles Clanton for Wired
Mystery foam rises out of a pig poop pit.
Hog farmers and scientists are baffled by an unidentified foamy substance bubbling out of manure pits at hog farms in Minnesota and surrounding states.

The methane-filled foam, which can rise four feet above ground level, has been responsible for a half-dozen barn explosions during the past three years.

Thing is, farmers had never encountered the poop foam until about five years ago. What it is, and why it forms, remains a mystery -- one that University of Minnesota researchers hope to crack soon.

Chuck Clanton, a bioproducts and biosystems engineering professor, told the Minnesota Daily that researchers right now are trying to figure out how different microorganisms -- primarily bacteria -- develop in the manure pit. They suspect a new set of species has formed in these pits in the last few years, in part as a result of ethanol-byproduct grains that have recently been incorporated into hogs' diet in higher volumes.

Still, there's clearly more to the story than just a dietary change -- as Clanton explains, "It's very frustrating when you have two identical buildings sitting next to each other with same management, genetics, diets, etc. One foams, and the other does not."

Wired, describing the foam as "a gelatinous goop that resembles brown Nerf," describes how the mystery substance forms and explodes in a recent post:
pig manure foam 2.jpg
Charles Clanton for Wired
Another shot of the foam.
The pits are emptied each fall, after which waste builds up again, turning them into something like giant stomachs: dark, oxygen-starved percolators in which bacteria and single-celled organisms metabolize the muck.

Methane is a natural byproduct, and is typically dispersed by fans before it reaches explosive levels. But inside the foam's bubbles, methane reaches levels of 60 to 70 percent, or more than four times what's considered dangerous. The foam can reach depths of more than four feet.

Disturb the bubbles, and enormous quantities of methane are released in a very short time. Add a spark -- from, say, a bit of routine metal repair, as happened in a September 2011 accident that killed 1,500 hogs and injured a worker -- and the barn will blow.
There's potentially a lot of money riding on the U of M's effort to figure out the foam -- the Daily reports tha
t considering the cost of materials and hogs, a barn explosion costs a farmer up to $300,000.

We're no hog farmers, but pigs are pretty smart, right? Maybe they could be potty-trained?

-- Hat-tip to A.V. Club Twin Cities for the headline.


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8 comments
Jess
Jess

Oh wow. Thanks for the reminder of my reasons for choosing pastured meats.

Carl Apostoli
Carl Apostoli

«Maybe they could be potty-trained?» Not funny at all.

Det. Sandy Trappie Bailey
Det. Sandy Trappie Bailey

Breaking News!Al Gore to Santorum: Internet Pollution is REAL. Put Your Shirt Back On! Obama Approves 700 Kabillion Dollar Emergency Spending On Operation "Hogger Blogger"It seems that "Little Piggy's" have been doing more than just going to market this week. They have been instrumental in finding out just where the moans, groans, nausea and facepalms from vast amounts of trash posts and revolting photos like the one of shirtless Santourm go. Scientists currently studying the exploding poop appearing on hog farms have determined their origin to be disgusting reactions to internet pollution picked up by your computer as not so free radicals and pumped into cyberspace, only to return to their original shit form on farms across the country. The feds have approved emergency measures to have undercover piggy's known as "Hogger Bloggers" pose as humans and track down offenders on Facebook and twitter. Government scientists have been given a portion of the 700 Kabillion dollars to study the new shit instead of the old shit they usually spend that much on. 

Tacyray
Tacyray

I'm with Kim. Hog factory farms are not good for the environment, our health, or the pigs. Ever wonder why they don't let the public see what goes on in these places?

OZ
OZ

"Ethanol byproduct grains."  Yum.

Kim Fraczek
Kim Fraczek

Potty trained? Do you think that is a humorous end note, Aaron? If the smart animals were taken care of properly is clean, healthy, roomy, smaller scale environments, we wouldn't have problems like this.

brit
brit

no kidding. is this happening on organic farms or just commercial farms where hogs are shoved together to swim in their own methaney poo? 

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