Timothy LaMere agrees to 10-year sentence for friend's 2-CE overdose

Categories: Crime, Tragedy
Thumbnail image for timothy lamere thumb.jpg
Timothy LaMere is convicted of providing a lethal overdose of 2-CE to his friend.
Timothy LaMere, the 22-year-old charged in the first-known 2-CE overdose death, agreed to a state-maximum 10-year prison sentence in court Thursday.

LaMere was charged with third-degree murder about a year ago after supplying the synthetic drug to a group of friends, causing 11 overdoses, including the death of LaMere's friend Trevor Robinson-Davis, a 19-year-old father.

According to the original charges, LaMere showed up at a house party during spring break and offered friends what he called "2-CI." He told everyone the grayish powder was a hallucinogen, and snorted a line. At least 10 others took the drug as well.

Thumbnail image for trevor robinson.jpg
Trevor Robinson-Davis was the first-known victim of a lethal 2-CE overdose.
Things got ugly pretty quickly after that. First Robinson-Davis began yelling and punching walls. Then he couldn't breathe. Others got sick and disoriented. Someone eventually called 911 and while other partygoers waited for the ambulance, another friend drove Robinson-Davis to the hospital and left him in the parking lot. By the time he got medical attention, it was already too late. He died soon after of cardiac arrest, which the medical examiner determined was a result of the drug.

Authorities identified the substance as 2-CE, a synthetic party drug commonly referred to as "Europa." Developed by Alexander Shulgin, a psychopharmacologist known for popularizing Ecstasy, the drug can bring on intense hallucinations.

At the time of the mass overdose, police knew very little about the synthetic drug, though some believed synthetics in general were becoming more popular.

"These analog-type drugs are kind of becoming more and more of a problem," Anoka County Sheriff commander Paul Sommer told us in an interview after the incident. "We haven't specifically dealt with anything of this magnitude."

Perhaps this is why the feds decided to make an example out of LaMere? According to the Star Tribune, the U.S. Attorney's Office threatened to intervene with federal charges if Anoka County prosecutors didn't get a maximum sentence. LaMere said in court that the letter influenced his decision to take the plea deal.

LaMere will be formally sentenced on May 25.

Previous Coverage:

  • Timothy Richard Lamere charged with third degree murder in mass overdose
  • Trevor Robinson mourned after overdose
  • 2-CE: What is it?



  • Sponsor Content

    Minnesota Concert Tickets

    From the Vault

     

    Loading...