US Bank closes UC Davis branch, cites "intolerable" Occupy protests

Categories: Protest News
us bank protesters uc davis.jpg
This was reportedly the scene outside the bank everyday.
Minneapolis-based US Bank is mad as hell about UC Davis' Occupy protests, and executives aren't going to take it anymore.

Citing the "intolerable" situation created by the daily protests outside the bank's doors, US Bank officials abruptly closed the US Davis branch location at the end of February, ending an agreement with the school that generated upward of $170,000 annually for student activities.

In a letter to officials at the Sacramento-area university, US Bank Senior Vice President Daniel Hoke said the bank had been "constructively evicted" and that its employees were "effectively imprisoned" by the protesters.

From UC Davis' student newspaper, The California Aggie:
pepper spray.jpg
This infamous incident took place outside the UC Davis US Bank last November 18.
For those involved, the blockade became a daily ritual. Protesters -- typically numbering around 15 -- would arrive around noon, followed by an officer from the campus police department. Thirty minutes later, bank employees would leave and the entire process would be repeated the next day.

University officials contend protesters were in violation of California Penal Code Section 647C, which makes it a misdemeanor to "willfully and maliciously" obstruct the free movement of any person on any street, sidewalk or other public place. However, demonstrators were not arrested. For their part, protesters asserted that a private bank had no place on a public university.
At one point, US Bank went as far as to hire private security guards to stand watch outside the branch, but they were recalled after the university said they weren't acceptable.

Without guards, and with protestors ringing the branch location everyday, US Bank officials apparently came to the conclusion that they have no choice but to close the branch. The bank issued a statement saying "despite our best attempts, we were limited in our ability to resolve the matter and were forced to close the office."

US Bank is seeking damages for lost business. University spokespeople have said they hope to mediate a settlement.

According to the Sacramento Bee, in November 2009, UC Davis announced a 10-year agreement with U.S. Bank to provide nearly $3 million to support student services and bring the campus its first bank branch. Less the three years in, the bank has now pulled out.

The UC Davis US Bank is probably best known as the site of Lt. John Pike's casual pepper-spraying of demonstrators last November.

Related:
-- Occupy Homes MN to deliver 6,000 signatures to US Bank
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23 comments
A former student
A former student

As far as I understand this, the motivation behind these protests was rather complex, involving details of the deal between the bank and the university (granting the bank certain privileges) and the conflict of interest ("serving the students" vs. "benefiting from higher tuition, which forces students to take out ever more expensive loans"). Your article really could have gone into these issues a little deeper than by saying "protesters asserted that a private bank had no place on a public university."

Mrslickt
Mrslickt

Good. Now perhaps treason charges against the Occupy communist movement? Anti-American activities...

Hijunttila
Hijunttila

Go go Occupy! Job well done. This is support from Finland.

JXRN
JXRN

"The UC Davis US Bank is probably best known as the site of Lt. John Pike's casual pepper-spraying of demonstrators last November."

That's VERY poorly worded. U.S. Bank had nothing to do with the pepper-spraying, in addition, the pepper-spraying took place nowhere NEAR the bank branch.The protestors were outside in the quad. The U.S. Bank's former location was inside Memorial Hall. Way to word that with a major slant, Aaron.

In other news... these Occupy groups need to realize their movement faltered, and people seem them as nothing more than common criminals - disrupting business and the flow of commerce. 

Kirk the Conservative Jerk
Kirk the Conservative Jerk

How many of these people have parents who have retirement accounts in U.S Bank?How many of these people have parents who own stock in U.S. Bank as part of their portfolio? ("Fund", "ETF")

Here is some of the stocks Barack Obama owns as part of ONE of his funds -1 Chevron Corp2 Home Depot Inc/The3 Merck & Co Inc4 Royal Dutch Shell PLC5 Johnson & Johnson6 Pfizer Inc7 Marsh & McLennan Cos Inc8 Philip Morris International Inc9 AT&T Inc10 General Electric Co

Knowledge doesn't prevail here...

kmd
kmd

So, the US Bank office now knows what it is like for Planned Parenthood offices and patients across the country. IMHO they are fare more deserving.

ludwigtr
ludwigtr

maybe the tens of thousands of people that were evicted from their homes should seek damages as well?  mm?

you lost, go cry about it elsewhere.

FellowHuman
FellowHuman

Jeez! 'Protesters said a private bank had no business on a public university...'

That's so freaking childish. They didn't start a credit union, they shut down a bank. That's what's wrong with these protests. I'm all for fixing/punishing the corrupt banks, but not by sitting outside them until they close and then going 'holy crap, our direct deposit is going NOWHERE. How do we get money?'

Albatross
Albatross

I feel so bad about this US Bank branch being evicted from its home...  Look, I'm playing this ---> .  Know what that is? The world's tiniest violin!

PunkIntellect
PunkIntellect

You're being sarcastic, right? Because this country was founded on protest. You need to read some history.

anon4theworld
anon4theworld

Youre an idiot....join the rest of the sheeple and continue to drag this country under. 

Jody
Jody

The people who were evicted from their homes were people who didn't make their mortgage payments.  See, I don't know if you have heard, but when you take out a loan on a home or a vehicle and you don't make your payments, your home or vehicle is then returned to the bank who gave you the loan in the first place.  It is written in the contract that you signed and AGREED to.  Its been that way for quite a long time now........

ludwigtr
ludwigtr

I don't see anything in this article about people complaining about their direct deposit going nowhere.  You honestly believe another bank won't move in?  or open nearby?  They signed up for this checking account....chances are they're smart enough to do it again with another bank, and set up direct deposit again...

Ana
Ana

Pero uno ni siquiera se imaginaba q iban a dejar sin empleo a millones d personas en tan poco tiempo

CB
CB

you forgot to mention that, because the banks buy and sell these mortgages left and right, you have these banks forclosing on peoples homes illegally and without paperwork. the bank says they own the house? then why is there no deed? thats why alot of these banks are being investigated.

Anonymous
Anonymous

 You really don't understand why people are upset with USBank?Really?

FellowHuman
FellowHuman

And why wouldn't protesters force another bank out of the campus, since their only rational for forcing this one out was that it was, in fact, a bank? I'm just trying to say, arguing against all banks being around is kind of nuts.

JXRN
JXRN

And this removes the responsibility of the homeowners to pay their mortgages ... how? Just because a bank doesn't have paperwork for a mortgage that was acquired on the secondary market doesn't mean people can stop paying their mortgages.

Majority of the people losing their homes didn't look past the gleaming idea of homeownership. Oh, you mean we're supposed to look at loan documents to see what the payment schedule is? Pffffft. That's for suckers.

Seriously. Take some freaking personal responsibility for things YOU SIGN.

FellowHuman
FellowHuman

Well I admit I don't know more about this than what the article said. 

Now that US Bank can hold the school on the line for 'damages due to lost business,' the real losers here are everybody at the school. 

ludwigtr
ludwigtr

They didn't protest it because it was just "a bank" they protested because this particular bank is taking homes away from people who signed loans they didn't understand, and sold those mortgages knowing that they were going to fail but they didn't give a crap cause they were still going to make a crap ton of money on the "investment" at the cost of people losing their homes, and refusing to negotiate a fair term for that loan.

I guess your argument would be good if it was based on any fact at all, or based in reality somewhere.

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