Vikings, Rybak, Dayton, pro-Vikes legislators finally unveil stadium plan

Categories: Vikings
Vikings stadium rendering.JPG
1500 ESPN
A rendering of the Vikings stadium plan legislators and the Mpls City Council will soon consider.
After months of hearing lawmakers carp that they couldn't speak to whether they support using public money for a new Vikings stadium without seeing a detailed proposal, a plan has finally emerged.

During a news conference earlier today, Gov. Dayton and the Vikings unveiled a $975 million stadium plan that would build the Vikings new home on the current site of the Metrodome.

There weren't any big surprises in the proposal -- as expected, the state would use electronic pulltabs to fund its $398 million portion, with the city of Minneapolis repurposing existing taxes to fund its $150 million share. The other $427 would come from the Vikings and other private sources.

According to the plan, a fixed-roof stadium located on the eastern portion of what is now the Metrodome site would open in 2016, with the Vikings playing the 2015 season at TCF Bank stadium. The stadium's design would be modeled on Indianapolis' heralded Lucas Oil Stadium, which hosted the Super Bowl last month. There would be one square block of open tailgating space northwest of the stadium. The stadium would be owned by a stadium authority with state and city representatives.

Interestingly, Ted Mondale, Metropolitan Sports Commission Chairman, said the project would also include a pitch to lure a Major League Soccer team to play in the new stadium.

A stadium bill will likely be introduced in the legislature next week. The Minneapolis City Council also needs to approve the plan, but whether Rybak can secure support from a majority of councilors remains uncertain.

Alluding to the fact that the plan needs legislative and city approval, Dayton said during today's news conference that "much work remains to be done."
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Dayton: "Now the real work begins."

Dayton stressed that the public contribution for the stadium wouldn't come from the general fund or increased taxes. He characterized the deal to build a "people's stadium" as a "remarkable accomplishment."

As the Pioneer Press details, under the terms of the plan, 56 percent of project funding would come from the public, with 44 percent coming from private sources. Here's how that split compares with other recent NFL stadium projects:
2010 New York Giants/Jets $1.6 billion, 100% private (not counting publicly funded infrastructure improvements)
2010 Kansas City $388 million; 68% public, 32% private
2009 Dallas $1.1 billion; 41% public, 59% private
2008 Indianapolis $720 million; 86% public, 14% private
2006 Arizona $455 million; 68% public, 32% private
Dayton estimated that the project would create about 8,000 construction jobs and 5,000 jobs on the supply side. Is that enough to win the support of legislators and the  Minneapolis City Council? Whether the Vikings stay in Minnesota past next season may depend on it.

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9 comments
Bcnelson2
Bcnelson2

I'm overly perplexed as to why we should spend any money for a stadium that has a "fixed" roof. One of the greatest reasons a new stadium has been requested was to promote an "open or closed as needed" concept roof. And as another comment stated why spend $1B on a current design. We should be setting ourself on the map to speak with a new design. Mpls has a wonderful art program, why not get the design that fits the city, marks it as original, and produces pride in our town? The only thing to agree with is the location.... maybe!

Referendum
Referendum

ONE BILLION DOLLARS.  In a time when the economy is slumping.  Our politicians are all gung-ho about spending other people's money just so the team's owner can turn around and sell them for more money.  We'd basically be paying taxes to fill up one man's bank account.

Dear Vikings,The Metrodome is fine, quit being whiny babies that it doesn't have that new stadium smell.  You might have more of a leg to stand on if you won more than 3 out of 16 games in the season, but you didn't.  You don't deserve tax money when there's probably less than 1/4 of the state that is a fan of you.  Man up and play some football.

-Taxpayers

Any tax money being directed into funding a privately owned stadium, for a privately owned team to play 8 games in a year in, needs to be brought to a referendum.  But our politicians are so eager to build a stadium that they'll outright ignore the general opinion of the taxpayers.  They're afraid to bring the stadium money to a referendum because they know we will vote it down.

Referendum
Referendum

ONE BILLION DOLLARS.  In a slumping economy, paid for by taxpayers, just so the team's owner who doesn't even live here can turn around and sell the team.  So we're basically paying taxes to fill one man's bank account.

Dear Vikings,The Metrodome is fine, stop being babies and play your 8 games a year there.  You might have a stronger voice if you won more than 3 out of 16 games in a season.

-Taxpayers

Any public money being used to pay for a colossal money pit for a privately owned sports team that can't even win needs to be put to a referendum.  They're scared to because a referendum, reflecting the voice and opinion of the people who would be paying for this, would shut the whole thing down.  Because it's plainly obvious this is a bad deal for everyone but Wilf.

Katie Swanson
Katie Swanson

I'd be okay supporting this plan.  No general fund money is good, and restructuring taxes already in place for the Mpls contribution is (as a Mpls resident) something I can get behind.  Plus, construction would add jobs for the short-term (which puts more money back into the city and the state), and creates jobs for the long-term since it is a larger venue.

It also uses fewer public funds than all but two stadiums since 2006, so even if the team was willing to foot the entire bill, keeping some public funding in it keeps the team dedicated to what we want and need as a community.  Granted, everyone's wants and needs differ, but this would help the businesses already suffering from the Twins leaving the dome, and the infrastructure is already in place around the site.

amiller92
amiller92

Good first step.  Now let's get it done.

PutSomeRanchOnIt
PutSomeRanchOnIt

I sincerely hope the City Council holds out for the referendum. The Peoples' Stadium? Only if we vote for it.

nordeastmpls
nordeastmpls

Why are we copying the design of another city's stadium. Can't a billion dollars buy something that is unique?

wendy
wendy

everyone's got something to complain about. look, i'm complaining about you!

nordeastmpls
nordeastmpls

 I'm just sayin' a billion dollars should get us more than a big barn from Indiana.

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