How Minnesotans talk compared to the rest of the country [MAPS]

Categories: How We Live
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Sure, we have our verbal idiosyncrasies, but the maps indicate they're not as extreme as the Coen brothers would have you believe. 
Joshua Katz, a Ph. D student in statistics at North Carolina State University, recently used data from Professor Bert Vaux's linguistic surveys to put together a series of maps depicting variations in pronunciation and vocabulary throughout the country.

SEE ALSO: "Geography of Hate" maps show where racist and homophobic tweets come from [IMAGES]

Of course, Minnesota, like all other states, has its quirks. Below the jump, we share seven maps that show, don'tcha know, a few of the ways in which the Land of 10,000 Lakes (along with our Midwestern brethren) are unique.

You can enlarge the maps, which come via Business Insider's website, by clicking on them.

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16 comments
ANonnyMouse
ANonnyMouse

What would you call a large, bench-like, cushioned chair? I'd go for "couch" but my old German teacher who was from Minnesota used to tell us they called them "chesterfields" or something like that. It'd be interesting to see a map of the distribution for the various terms denoting this object.

Shawn Clark
Shawn Clark

me and my family is from Minnesota and we do not talk like that. My great grandma who is Norwegian didn't talk like that either. Its just stereo typing us its a bunch of BS.

Noah Hanson
Noah Hanson

We drink "pop", but live in "Minnesoda", ironic.

bianca101
bianca101

So my grandma ISN'T nuts for telling me that rain during sunshine means the devil is beating his wife?! Well maybe she is crazy but it's clearly a Southern thing. It all makes sense now..

Jane Peterson
Jane Peterson

we talk like regular people i dont know where that came from? talk to Canada.

ANonnyMouse
ANonnyMouse

@Shawn Clark  Youse (sic) and your family is (sic) not too goodly (sic) at the Eenglish (sic) methinks. This could be why you don't conform to regional trends. 

Also: Not a stereotype if it's backed by data.

Onan
Onan

@Shawn Clark  -  The research is about regional differences in speech, not about stereotyping a set of individuals. Read the data for yourself.

Onan
Onan

@Michael Pickar  - Same here, in fact, I don't use much of the "Minnesota Speak" at all, which is odd since I've been here almost all of my life.

Onan
Onan

@Patrick Wagner I, for one, drink "beer."

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