American Indian Movement will protest outside Vikings-Redskins game at Metrodome

Categories: Racism
RedskinsAIM.jpg
To publicize the upcoming protest, AIM has taken to using a logo (right) that's similar to the Redskins logo it finds offensive (left).
The American Indian Movement will march from the American Indian Center to the Metrodome on November 7 then hold a rally outside the stadium when the Vikings play the Redskins during a nationally televised contest that evening.

SEE ALSO: UMD hockey fans warned after "smallpox blankets" chant during Fighting Sioux series

The march and rally is in protest of the continued use of the "Redskins" nickname by D.C.'s NFL team. The issue has come under increased scrutiny this year as prominent national sportswriters Peter King and Bill Simmons have begun boycotting mentioning "Redskins" in their columns and protesters outside Washington's games have become a regular occurrence.

Here's an AIM press release detailing the group's plans for November 7 and the reasons for the rally and protest (click to enlarge):

letterfull.jpg

Redskins owner Daniel Synder said earlier this year that "We will never change the name of the team," and NFL Commish Roger Goodell has indicated he isn't inclined to force a renaming (though Goodell's stance seems to have softened a bit lately as poll after poll shows most people find the name offensive).

Nonetheless, in June, a group of Congress members led by Rep. Betty McCollum (she's co-chair of the Congressional Native American Caucus) wrote a letter to Synder urging him to reconsider.

"Native Americans throughout the country consider the term 'redskin' a racial, derogatory slur akin to the 'N-word' among African Americans or the 'W-word' among Latinos," McCollum and her colleagues wrote. "Such offensive epithets would no doubt draw wide-spread disapproval among the NFL's fan base. Yet the national coverage of Washington's NFL team profits from a term that is equally disparaging to Native Americans."

-- Follow Aaron Rupar on Twitter at @atrupar. Got a tip? Drop him a line at arupar@citypages.com.


My Voice Nation Help
158 comments
Milo J. David
Milo J. David

The last I heard 70 some percent of Native American's don't mind it.

MNjoe
MNjoe topcommenter

They should just change their logo to a potato and keep the Redskins name. Duty now for the future, spuds!

Paul Tollefson
Paul Tollefson

Did you see that? Because we don't think it's offensive we're racist. Being called a racist offends me.

mohanlon3
mohanlon3

Dietz's Indian heritage was first contested in 1916 after former neighbors who settled on the Pacific Coast heard he was posing as an Indian.[citation needed] In December 1918 the Federal Bureau of Investigation looked into his heritage after he fraudulently registered for the draft as a "Non-Citizen Indian" with an allotment.[citation needed] The Bureau found he had taken on the identity of James One Star, an Oglala man of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation 12 years his senior who had disappeared in 1894.[citation needed] Dietz also falsely claimed he was the head of an American film company that produced propaganda films for the war.[citation needed]

Dietz divorced De Cora in November 1918, charging her with abandonment.[citation needed] It is not clear how much she knew about his true identity.[citation needed] She died six days after his indictment.[citation needed]

Dietz was tried in Spokane, Washington in June of 1919 for the first offense.[citation needed] One Star's sister, Sallie Eaglehorse, testified after seeing him for the first time at the trial that Dietz was definitely not her brother.[citation needed] Still, the judge instructed the jury to determine whether Dietz "believed" he was an Indian, not whether it was true. Despite that others had witnessed his birth in the summer of 1884 or had seen him the following day, Dietz's mother Leanna claimed he was the Indian son of her husband who had been switched a week or more after she had a stillbirth. Dietz's acting ability along with his mother's fallacious testimony (to protect him from prison) resulted in a hung jury, but Dietz was immediately re-indicted.[citation needed] The second trial resulted in a sentence of 30 days in the Spokane County Jail after he pleaded "no contest".

mohanlon3
mohanlon3

Noted historian Linda M. Waggoner has traced Dietz' heritage in several articles in Indian Country Today Media Networkand at a 2013 symposium at the National Museum of the American Indian. He was born William Henry Dietz, or “Willie,” on August 17, 1884, in Rice Lake, Wisconsin, at 16 West Humbird Street. His father William Wallace Dietz, settled in the area in 1871 and was elected county sheriff in 1877. He married Leanna Ginder in November 1879. "Willie" attended Oklahoma’s Chilocco Indian Agricultural School, where it is likely he feigned some kind of Indian identity for the first time. As Waggoner wrote, "Naturally, visitors to the St. Louis World’s Fair exhibit, including Dietz’s future wife, Winnebago artist Angel De Cora, thought Dietz was a Chilocco student."  The guy wasn't Native.

Kevin Thompson
Kevin Thompson

I seen the swastika once, was never offended. People are such crybabies

Stacia Marie
Stacia Marie

You can find offense in just about anything. It is a personal emotion. Therefore, the person feeling that way is personally responsible for it and needs to find a way to deal with it and move forward.

Stacia Marie
Stacia Marie

Let's talk about the giant swastika at the top of the metrodome.

Woody Jaspersen
Woody Jaspersen

What about the Chicago Black hawks are they going to protest this team when they play the Mn Wild this year??? Get the FUCK over it..

Jessica Mosher
Jessica Mosher

I was raised by natives. I'm sorry I take offense. That is racist you don't think so because it does not affect you. Ask the native folk in Mpls and they are pissed.

Justin Vangness
Justin Vangness

I am a 30 year old divorced man who works in a warehouse. I drive a black Chevy S10 Crew Pickup. I live in a 3 bed, 3 bath house. I think if someone doesn't like the redskins name then don't buy the merchandise, don't go to the games and root against them. And that

cdwoody
cdwoody

Funny thing is this so called "racial slur" is so popular that no one has ever used it to put down an Native American. I'm part Cherokee and I find no offense. To tell you the honest truth, if Redskin is derogatory then Black is too! I'll be at the game on November 7th sporting the Maroon and Gold colors of my favorite team! You know, the one who's fight song cheers and uplifts the same group the media claims it puts down! I'll be on the lookout for all of the protesters also. I'm sure it will be unevenly marred with those whom aren't Native American. (SMH & LOL)

Paul Tollefson
Paul Tollefson

Joe, Del, Kevin, Shane, have you guys ever ran a pint of rubbing alcohol through a loaf of bread?

Nicole Schumacher
Nicole Schumacher

No one technically. I was using it as a filler word for society. In the history of our society that is what we as a society did. To be stubbornly degrading towards a specific culture through sports mascots is not something that should be nationally accepted.

Joe Strom
Joe Strom

Lol, its nothing to do with being dense, or stupid. We're living in a world where ANYTHING that offends ANYONE is BANNED. The problem is that people are way too easily offended by everything. If they were called the "Washington Indians that the Settlers Murdered", okay that's a little offensive. Most people don't realize where the "Redskins" name came from for this team. They were named this to honor the team's coach, whose mother was Sioux. Ooooh, so very offensive. Don't like it? Okay, that's fine, don't fucking watch it.

Ryan Schoen
Ryan Schoen

Sensitive ass people, get the f*** on with yourself!

MNjoe
MNjoe topcommenter

@Milo J. David Where did you hear that, the local tavern? Also, your apostrophe in American's is completely unnecessary. Please learn English.

MicheleBachmann
MicheleBachmann topcommenter

@Paul Tollefson Nice beard you racist sexist old bald freak.  

MNjoe
MNjoe topcommenter

@Paul Tollefson So you're saying don't be offensive to you but it's OK to be offensive to others?  Great plan, Paul.

mohanlon3
mohanlon3

Gee, I wonder why Native folks are pissed about the word Redskin being used to "honor" this amazing contributor to their culture.

MNjoe
MNjoe topcommenter

@Stacia Marie An old Jewish friend pointed that out to me in the 80s. Great memory!

mohanlon3
mohanlon3

@Woody Jaspersen The team's first owner was coffee tycoon Frederic McLaughlin, who outbid grain magnate James E. Norris for the franchise. McLaughlin had been a commander with the 333rd Machine Gun Battalion of the 86th Infantry Division during World War I.[3] This Division was nicknamed the "Blackhawk Division", after a Native American of the Sauk nation, Black Hawk, who was a prominent figure in the history of Illinois.  Totally different issue, one is a team name based on a military division and prominent figure in local history, the other is a racist epithet used when selling Native body parts for bounties.  Not even vaguely similar. See how fun reading and history can be, you should try it sometime.

cdwoody
cdwoody

Where are these pissed natives? I got friends on the Rez who aren't pissed, mad, or insulted and wear Redskins gear!

mohanlon3
mohanlon3

@cdwoody do you honestly think nobody has ever used the term "Redskin" to put down a Native, you must have never seen a single John Wayne film...  whatever...

MNjoe
MNjoe topcommenter

@mohanlon3 Always great to see the white folks on here telling people of other races why they shouldn't be offended by crap like this.  I'll be heading downtown for this one.

mohanlon3
mohanlon3

Do you walk around telling folks of Jewish heritage to get over Nazi Germany too?  yer an idiot, now go back to ice fishing and telling Rez jokes...

mohanlon3
mohanlon3

@cdwoodyI know people on the Rez who don't speak any Ojibway, don't respect elders, and never go to pow-wow, I wouldn't use their opinions as to what is or is not offensive to folks who do care to do and know those things.  Now, on the other hand, when Ms. LaDuke points something out I listen, as she is an elder and a spirit leader and is smarter than I will ever likely be.  Maybe you should ask someone like her about what people on the Rez think. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Winona_Laduke  she has a degree from Harvard.

Now Trending

Minnesota Concert Tickets

From the Vault

 

Loading...