Plans for downtown's largest park could be derailed by Vikings-Wells Fargo beef [UPDATE]

Categories: Minneapolis
stribrendering1.jpg
This is what the city and Ryan Cos. hope the eastern part of downtown will look like come 2016.
:::: UPDATE ::::

Vikings and Wells Fargo officials were able to come to an agreement over the weekend.

The AP reports that the deal, subject to City Council approval, allows Wells Fargo to place 56-foot signs on each of the new towers so long as they don't "conflict with surrounding property interest."

Vikings spokesman Lester Bagley channeled former Purple coach Dennis Green in explaining the agreement to the media.

"We took the high road and did what we needed to do to get this done," Bagley said, according to a Pioneer Press report. "We're going to be neighbors."

Original post (December 6) -- In conjunction with the now-underway construction of the new Vikings stadium, Minneapolis officials are hoping to turn the Star Tribune property into downtown's biggest park via a $400 million redevelopment project that would also involve the construction of two 17-floor office towers, 300 residential units, and retail stores.

RELATED: Star Tribune likely moving into Capella Tower, report says

But those plans have hit a snag due to a beef between the Vikings and Wells Fargo, which is expected to own the two office towers.

The Vikings essentially have veto power over how the Star Tribune land is redeveloped, and team officials are taking umbrage with Wells Fargo's plan to place bright signs adorned with the bank's logo on the top of the aforementioned office buildings.

The Star Tribune's Eric Roper explains:
Wells Fargo... is demanding bright logos atop the buildings that would be visible during football game aerial shots. The signs would require a change in the zoning code and are fiercely opposed by the Vikings, who say the signs could hurt their efforts to sell naming rights on the stadium...

Wells Fargo spokeswoman Peggy Gunn warned that they have a contingency allowing them to withdraw from the project.

"We are making a $300 million investment, that's what's on the table here," she said. "And we think it's reasonable that some signs reflecting this investment be allowed."
Roper also tweeted out a rendering of the sort of thing Wells Fargo officials have in mind: Officials hope to bring the redevelopment project before the City Council for a vote during the final council meeting of Mayor R.T. Rybak's tenure on December 13, so time might be running short for the Vikings and Wells Fargo to hammer out an agreement.

:::: UPDATE ::::

An updated rendering suggests how Wells Fargo is trying to compromise with the Vikings -- by making the signs on the top of the office buildings smaller.

Compare this image with the one above and you'll see what we mean: -- Follow Aaron Rupar on Twitter at @atrupar. Got a tip? Drop him a line at arupar@citypages.com.


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17 comments
digitalprotocol
digitalprotocol topcommenter

i knew this would happen. the huge park is the only cool thing this shit somali city has going. 


now they will clearly scrap plan that and bend over for wells fargo. somebody needs to make that bank fall


of course there wont be a park to make tax payers happy, just another huge bank

MrGasso
MrGasso

I don't trusy Ryan or the Vikings. Just my opinion!

Gene Hawk
Gene Hawk

why not get rid of the vikings and wells fargo and build a bigger park

Cadillac Kolstad
Cadillac Kolstad

There is also the not so small issue of the developer needing a permit to demolish the well maintained Star Tribune building currently nominated for historic designation. If this were converted to residences all indications are that it would be fully occupied with a waiting list before renovations were complete. Take as an example the Buzza residences on lake street. Currently the city is allowing permits to build on any open space available right across the freeway in Cedar Riverside, the most densely populated neighborhood in MN. This park seems geared toward people who don't live anywhere near here (I live 8 blocks away).

Marc Allen Headrick
Marc Allen Headrick

Seriously, the Vikings Stadium size alone will have its own identity, the naming rights are some added drizzle on their building's sizzle. Let Wells Fargo proceed without anymore fizzle.

Ryan Moe
Ryan Moe

Tom Fru that's some funny commenting!

_Joe_
_Joe_

So wait.... WE are paying for the stadium, but the vikings get to sell the naming rights?


Fuck that noise.  That needs to go to the state!

Ryan Wiese
Ryan Wiese

They should worry about the naming rights and how few nationally televised games they'll get with the team they currently have first

JL1969
JL1969

This plan is one the fundamental problems with Minneapolis development ideas.

When city is redeveloping a neighborhood, they need to look at as much of the big picture as possible.  The fact that this park is downtown's largest (being two 1/2-block parcels) is absurd.  The fact that it is surrounded by a busy one way street, two parking garages, and Wells Fargo is even dumber. 

Minneapolis, look to St Paul for development ideas!

Paul Walker
Paul Walker

Signs? Wish Wells Fargo cared more about their consumers.

Bob Alberti
Bob Alberti

It's as if two guys were beating me up and got into an argument about exactly HOW to beat me up, so they dragged me in front of a judge to explain how kidney kicks are or are not better than gut kicks, without anyone asking how I was feeling about the whole thing.

Marlena Myles
Marlena Myles

"Plans for downtown's largest park" isn't at all what they're arguing about: $.

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