Dayton signs another bill to move mentally ill offenders out of jail faster

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Minnesota Gov. Mark Dayton has signed another bill designed to speed the at-times painstakingly slow process of moving severely mentally ill people out of jail and into the proper care.

Authored by Sen. Julianne Ortman (R-Chanhassen) and Rep. Debra Hilstrom (DFL-Brooklyn Center), the new law will combine two redundant psychiatric evaluations that can delay the mental health commitment process. The bill won't solve all the problems with Minnesota's troubled civil commitment system, but it will help some get to treatment faster, says Judge Jay Quam, who previously presided over commitment court in Hennepin County.

See also:
Civil commitment leaves Hennepin County offenders languishing

"It pretty effectively addresses one part of the problem," says Quam.

We exposed the dysfunctions in Minnesota's civil commitment system in our March 2012 investigation, "Unfit for Trial," which found severely mentally ill offenders frequently sit in jail for weeks or months waiting for treatment, often leaving in worse condition than when they arrived.

In one example, a man named Ronald Brewer was arrested for possession of Oxycodone pills. Brewer suffered from major depressive disorder, and was ultimately found unfit to face charges, but spent five months in solitary confinement before he was transferred to a hospital, court records show.

At the time of our initial reporting, Quam and others opined about the unnecessary redundancy of the two psychiatric evaluations. From the feature:

"Right now, it's a sequential process," says [Attorney Doug] McGuire. "They have to go through the criminal process until they get to a point where the criminal process says, 'We can't deal with you anymore'.... You end up with an individual that--if they end up refusing medications, which they can do very easily if they're not under commitment--they end up coming to the mental health court so psychiatrically decompensated that it takes a long time for them to get back."

The new law is one of several measures the Legislature is taking to address these problems. Dayton signed another law last May ordering the state to move mentally ill offenders out of jail within 48 hours of being civilly committed by a judge.

Quam says he's hopeful about another measure moving through the Senate right now that would create a new hub in the Twin Cities designed to assess and provide resources for offenders with severe mental illnesses. Instead of bringing them to jail, police could admit these mentally ill people to the facility, where they would get proper care immediately.

"This operates on the premise that the best way to keep people from languishing in jail is to prevent them from being there in the first place," says Quam.


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11 comments
Jennifer Dahn
Jennifer Dahn

I don't care for Mark Dayton, but as a mental health worker I can commend him on signing this bill.

kurt124
kurt124 topcommenter

Daytons a nutter himself.   Ever heard this guy try and throw a complete  thought together? 

mingtran
mingtran topcommenter

Dayton knows the mentally ill are his #1 supporters...just ask MB

MicheleBachmann
MicheleBachmann topcommenter

Terrible headline from an asshole reporter.   This is a serious problem and you go with the most sensational headline?    

Truth_Teller_1
Truth_Teller_1 topcommenter

@mingtran  Dayton should know a lot about mental illness - ever listen to him speak?

Kevin Hoffman
Kevin Hoffman

@MicheleBachmann  This reporter is the person most responsible for bringing this serious problem to public attention in the Twin Cities and goading government officials to address the issue. In fact, his cover story on the subject was photocopied and distributed to statehouse policy-makers -- I know this because they called me and asked permission to do so, which I was happy to grant. I don't know which part of the headline you find to be sensational, but even a cursory reading of the first two paragraphs of the piece makes clear our intentions.

MicheleBachmann
MicheleBachmann topcommenter

@Kevin Hoffman  I may have been crabby this morning but it doesn't change the fact this is a terrible headline.  It makes it sound like mentally ill prisoners are getting out of jail thanks to Mark Dayton.  Your first two paragraphs do clear it up.  Your headline is confusing.  I apologize for my dumb stupid comment.


Also since you apparently read all the comment sections why is City Pages so tolerant of racism, homophobia, and sexism in their comment section?  

Kevin Hoffman
Kevin Hoffman

@MicheleBachmann Mentally ill prisoners are getting out of jail thanks to Mark Dayton, and that's a good thing. The mentally ill belong in hospitals, not jails or prisons. I would recommend reading Andy Mannix's original groundbreaking feature story about this major problem in our community:

Civil commitment leaves Hennepin County offenders languishing

kurt124
kurt124 topcommenter

@MicheleBachmann Because what you think racism, homophobia, and sexism are, is not.    It is just what you call people who don't share your sick viewpoint.

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