Minnesota's Medical Marijuana Industry Launches New Pot Labs

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Wikimedia, family photo courtesy of Jessica Hauser
Wyatt Hauser, 2, suffers from constant severe seizures. His parents plan to enroll him in Minnesota's medical marijuana program once dispensaries open in July.

The idea is to put pot in the pocket of every Minnesotan who is in pain. If all goes according to plan, the nation's 22nd state to legalize medical marijuana will start distributing cannabis pills and liquids to thousands of patients by mid-summer.

On Monday the state Department of Health charged two labs located in Cottage Grove and Otsego with producing Minnesota's entire supply of medical marijuana products. LeafLine Labs and Minnesota Medical Solutions are responsible for opening four distribution centers each by July 1. For a hookup, individuals need only a doctor's recommendation to register with the state's medical marijuana program.

It's an exciting time for local medical weed refugees, Minnesotan families who formerly had to travel out of state in search of humanitarian cannabis treatments. It's also a good sign -- let's face it -- for the unapologetic 420 libertarians looking to get high, but the win this round is chiefly for the cancer survivors, the AIDS patients, and the kids suffering from constant seizures.

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Sen. Branden Petersen Helps Draw Attention to Minnesota's Contradictory Cannabis Laws

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State Sen. Branden Petersen, left, and Kurtis Hanna
Next month, activist Kurtis Hanna will speak to the Minnesota Board of Pharmacy about removing cannabis from its list of Schedule 1 narcotics.

His argument is simple: State law says cannabis has "no currently accepted medical use in the United States," but that's not true. Not only did Minnesota just approve a medical cannabis program, but more than half the United States now allows cannabis or some kind of CBD-rich oil for treatment.

See also:
Marijuana Policy Project PAC Throws Gov. Dayton Under Bus


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Cannabis Supporters Take One Final Shot at Mark Dayton

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Pat McClellan wants to see more medical cannabis

As the television camera lights shine on Pat McLellan's face, he holds up a set of four sheets of paper, each a signed pledge from a gubernatorial candidate saying that they support expanding Minnesota's medical cannabis laws.

He takes a breath, then spreads the papers out across the podium in front of him. They're all here, he says. GOP candidate Jeff Johnson. The Independence Party's Hannah Nicollet. Libertarian Chris Holbrook and Grassroots Party candidate Chris Wright. But one's missing: incumbent Mark Dayton.

See also:
Marijuana Policy Project PAC Throws Gov. Dayton Under Bus


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Duluth Considers Six-Month Moratorium on Medical Cannabis Manufacturers

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Dank Depot
By next year, there may be as many as a thousand medical cannabis patients in northern Minnesota, though it's seeming less and less likely that any of them will pick up their supplies in Duluth.

Earlier this month, the city's planning committee proposed a six-month moratorium on cannabis manufacturers or distributors, giving city officials time to consider how a facility would affect the homestead.

See also:
David Paul Patterson Says He Was Arrested for Saving Lives With Marijuana



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Marijuana Policy Project PAC Throws Gov. Dayton Under Bus

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-- Update at bottom with comment from Rep. Branden Petersen --

In a press release sent our way by an MNGOP-affiliated source, the D.C.-based Marijuana Policy Project PAC pledges to make a maximum financial contribution of $4,000 to Jeff Johnson's gubernatorial campaign.

But lest you think the nation's largest marijuana policy organization is some sort of surprisingly right-leaning group, the release also notes that the PAC plans to give a matching contribution to the Senate DFL PAC. Take that, DFL Gov. Mark Dayton!

See also:
Independence Party becomes first major party to support legalization of marijuana


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Kurtis Hanna Petitions Minnesota Board of Pharmacy Over Contradictory Cannabis Laws

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E. Katie Holm
Kurtis Hanna, a cannabis activist, was featured in our January 29, 2014, cover story
Last time we checked, cannabis was still a Schedule I narcotic in Minnesota. Why? Because, according to the statute, it has, like heroin, "A high potential for abuse, no currently accepted medical use in the United States, and a lack of accepted safety for use under medical supervision."

At least the last of those two is false. Minnesota is in the midst of establishing a medical cannabis program and 21 other states, plus D.C., have their own on the books. Other states, like Utah, allow for the use of CBD-rich oil to treat certain ailments.

See also:
David Paul Patterson Says He Was Arrested for Saving Lives With Marijuana



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David Paul Patterson Says He Was Arrested for Saving Lives With Marijuana

Categories: Crime, Marijuana

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Marijuana Growers Headquarters
David Patterson says he used cannabis oils to save lives

When David Paul Patterson arrives in Hubbard County District Court in Park Rapids, Minnesota, he dresses up. Not in a suit and tie, but in baggy shorts falling below his knees and a forest-green shirt with a giant marijuana leaf splayed across the front. His "court uniform," Patterson calls it.

It's a bold strategy, especially for a man facing trial for drug sale and possession. But the way Patterson sees it, there's nothing to hide. He openly admits to having pounds of marijuana in his remote house in the woods of Walker, Minnesota. But he says he's using it to save people's lives. That goes beyond the law.

See also:
Angela Brown Charged For Giving Medical Marijuana To Her Son


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Richard Stulz, County Attorney Going After Medical Cannabis Mom, Is Running Unopposed

Categories: Law, Marijuana
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Marijuana Growers Headquarters
Do you think Richard Stulz, Lac Qui Parle County attorney, is doing a good job spending taxpayer dollars by going after Angela Brown, the mother who gave her son medical cannabis to treat a brain injury?

Apparently, other attorneys in Lac Qui Parle County are apathetic about that question, as according to the Minnesota Secretary of State's website, Stulz is running for reelection without opposition this year.

See also:
Angela Brown Due in Court; Charges Haven't Been Dropped


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Angela Brown, Medical Cannabis Mom, Due in Court Today; Charges Haven't Been Dropped

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Courtesy of Angela Brown
Angela Brown and her son, Trey.
:::: UPDATE :::: Richard Stulz, County Attorney Going After Medical Cannabis Mom, is Running Unopposed

Last month, we told you about Angela Brown, the Madison, Minnesota resident who was charged with two gross misdemeanors for giving cannabis extracts to her teenage son, Trey, to treat a traumatic brain injury he suffered in 2011.

Brown's story generated quite a stir, mostly among people who couldn't begin to understand why the Lac Qui Parle county attorney, Richard Stulz, thought it was a good idea to press charges in this case. But the controversy apparently didn't deter Stulz, as this morning Brown is due in court in Montevideo, where she plans to enter a "not guilty" plea.

See also:
Prosecutor isn't talking about why he decided to charge medical marijuana mom Angela Brown


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Legal Marijuana Could Bring in $46 Million Annually for Minnesota, Study Says

Categories: Marijuana
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This stuff is green in more ways than one.
Marijuana sales would bring in roughly $45,950,063 in tax revenue annually for the state of Minnesota if pot were legalized, according to a study put together by NerdWallet.

NerdWallet's methodology is rather impressive. Researcher Divya Raghavan used data from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration to estimate how many people over the age of 25 smoke pot in each state, then used that number to divvy up the $14 billion nationwide marijuana market and determine how much stoners are likely to spend in each one. The total tax dollar figure for each state assumes a 15 percent excise tax for marijuana purchases, which is the going rate currently in Colorado.

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The new Green Giant looks like he just took a bong rip [PHOTO]


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