Dennis Carter, MSU-Mankato football star, allegedly shot man over marijuana debt

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Dennis Carter
Dennis Carter, a standout wide receiver for MSU-Mankato, faces an attempted murder charge for allegedly shooting a longtime acquaintance in the head over a marijuana debt.

The incident occurred shortly before midnight on August 20 along a dirt road near the Renaissance Festival campgrounds in Scott County. The victim, later identified as 28-year-old Diaa Ahmed Abdelhakim, says Carter shot him execution-style and only failed to kill him because his gun jammed. Carter, on the other hand, told investigators he accidentally shot Abdelhakim after wrestling his gun away from him during a struggle.

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Mankato's Tyler Caputo charged with murder for allegedly selling synthetic hallucinogen


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Prosecutor isn't talking about why he decided to charge medical marijuana mom Angela Brown

Categories: Crime, Marijuana
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Marijuana Growers Headquarters
One person's medicine is law enforcement's drug -- at least until next year, when Minnesota's medical marijuana program is rolled out.
On Wednesday and Thursday, we called Richard Stulz, Lac Qui Parle county attorney, in hopes of speaking with him about why he decided to press charges against Angela Brown, the Madison, Minnesota woman who gave her ailing teenage son medical marijuana oil to (effectively) treat symptoms stemming from a traumatic brain injury.

But Stulz, unfortunately, isn't in the mood to talk about it. Our calls weren't returned, and that appears to be the case for other reporters who have reached out to him as well.

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Feds to keep $138,121 in cash seized at MSP because it smelled like pot


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Angela Brown charged for giving medical marijuana to her ailing son

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Courtesy of Angela Brown
Angela Brown and her son, Trey.
:::: UPDATE :::: Prosecutor isn't talking about why he decided to charge medical marijuana mom Angela Brown

In a year, she'd be applauded as nothing more and nothing less than a law-abiding, caring mom. But fact is, Minnesota's medical marijuana law hasn't gone into effect and won't until next summer, so instead, Angela Brown faces criminal charges.

The Madison, Minnesota resident has been hit with two gross misdemeanor charges for giving medical marijuana to her son, Trey, who suffered a traumatic brain injury when he was struck in the head by a baseball in the spring of 2011.

See also:
9-year-old pot snitch told police, "Doing drugs is bad"


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Marijuana Policy Project on how to improve the medical cannabis program for everyone

Categories: Marijuana
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Coleen Danger
Earlier this month, high-ranking folks from the health department staffers gave an all-day presentation about pot. They urged the public to take a look at the first draft of rules governing the program, as well as the application for growers, and be honest.

In response, the DC-based Marijuana Policy Project, whose lobbyists played a key role in getting legislation passed here, submitted a six-page critique. The goal, writes Robert Capecchi, a deputy director, should be to avoid regulating the growers out of business while offering protections for patients and the facilities that produce the medicine.

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MN Health Department is asking cannabis growers to help shape new program



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MN Health Department is asking cannabis growers to help shape new program

Categories: Marijuana
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Manny Munson-Regala, an assistant public health commissioner, speaks to interested growers at the Minnesota Historical Center
State officials don't know squat about pot. But in time, they will.

The rules governing Minnesota's medical cannabis program, which went out last week, are only a first draft based on conversations with other states and a review of relevant literature. They are an impressive one at that, but a best guess of what it takes to get off the ground in a crazy quick period of time.

See also:
MN Department of Health releases early rules, application for pot producers



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Meeting for potential pot producers moved to an auditorium to accommodate 220 people

Categories: Marijuana
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Dank Depot
Friday's cannabis meeting has been moved to accommodate a larger-than-anticipated pool of potential producers. So large, in fact, that the Minnesota Department of Health has reserved the 3M Auditorium at the Minnesota History Center.

The new address is 345 W. Kellogg Boulevard, in St. Paul, and the event starts at 9 a.m. The number of RSVPs is close to 220, according to a spokesman for the health department.

See also:
MN Department of Health releases early rules, application for pot producers



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MN Department of Health releases early rules, application for pot producers

Categories: Marijuana
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Coleen Danger
The Minnesota Department of Health on Friday released rules governing future medical cannabis manufacturers, stressing that the 40-page document is only a first draft. State officials acknowledge that the rules are pretty vague, but also ask for public feedback.

The security requirements are no joke. Manufacturers will be prohibited from employing anyone with a felony criminal record and must visually record the entrances of their facilities 24-hours a day -- even in the event of a power outage. The vehicles transporting cannabis are not allowed to make stops away from facilities and fueling stations. Their routes must be random.

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Lawyers petition Supreme Court to get in on medical cannabis



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Lawyers petition Supreme Court to get in on medical cannabis

Categories: Marijuana

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Dank Depot

Medical cannabis is quickly becoming a lucrative business in Minnesota, with potential manufacturers and consulting companies wanting to get in on the action. But one group -- lawyers -- is being locked out of the market so far by their own code of ethics, and they're trying to get it fixed as soon as possible.

The law firm Thompson Hall sent a petition to the Minnesota Supreme Court last week looking to change the state's rules for lawyers. Right now, the rules say that lawyers can't give advice to those applying to be one of the state's two cannabis manufacturers. The conflict boils down to a few lines in the Minnesota Rules of Professional Conduct, basically an ethics guide for lawyers in the state.

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American Cannabis Company is counseling potential Minnesota pot producers


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Gov. Dayton's medical cannabis task force meets for the first time

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Dank Depot

The last time we heard legislators arguing about medical cannabis, it was in May, with politicians, law enforcement officials, and activists taking swings at each other over how broad the legislation should be. The bill the state ultimately passed was underwhelming, and left several legislators fuming over just how narrow it was.

On Thursday, those same legislators, activists, and law enforcement officials gathered together again, for the first meeting of the state's 23-member medical marijuana task force. This time, the mood was far more cordial.

See also:
Gov. Mark Dayton's medical cannabis task force includes staunch opponents and supporters


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Medical cannabis task force meeting changed

Categories: Marijuana
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Dank Depot
Take note, people: The location of Thursday's medical cannabis task force meeting has changed.

Do not go to the Orville Freeman building in St. Paul. Instead, go here:
Room 10 of the State Office Building, 100 Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m.
See also:
Dayton's medical cannabis task force includes staunch opponents and supporters



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