Why Do Only 30 Minneapolis Cops Live Within the City?

Wikipedia original photo
Compared to departments in other big cities, the number of MPD officers who live within city limits is way low.

Police Officers Federation of Minneapolis President John Delmonico has heard the argument for years. He didn't buy it then. He's not buying it now.

"I certainly don't believe for a moment that if a cop doesn't live in the same city where he works that he's not going to give 100 percent," says the lieutenant, who's been the union chief since 1999. "To me it's a non-issue and the one people bring up because it's easy to point at."

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Here Are the Latest Plans For Gigantic 750-Apartment Development in NE Minneapolis

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Lennar Multifamily via Minneapolis Planning Commission
Plans are moving forward for one of the Twin Cities' largest housing developments in years

This baby is going to be big.

On Thursday one of the largest construction companies in America will have its first public meeting with the city of Minneapolis to talk about its proposed development spanning two blocks in Northeast near the Mississippi River.

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Parking Meter App Initially Approved by Minneapolis, Trial Planned For Spring

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Ben Johnson
Just look at those people, lined up waiting to pay for parking like savages

Yesterday a Minneapolis City Council committee raised no objections to using a new app to pay for street parking in Minneapolis, paving the way for a trial run involving about 500 of the city's 7,500 metered parking spaces later this spring.

If the trial run goes well, by the time summer's over people in Minneapolis will no longer have to deal with the city's mildly irritating rectangular payment boxes.

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Soon You May Be Able to Pay For Street Parking From Your Phone in Minneapolis

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Ben Johnson
No more fidgeting with this box?

In the big scheme of things paying for on-street parking in Minneapolis is a minor inconvenience, we know, but it is a pain in the ass.

You have to remember your stall number, punch it in, swipe your credit card, hope it authorizes on the first try, figure out how much money to add, then hit print. And if you want to stay longer, well, set a timer and run out and repeat the process every two hours.

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Credit Card Parking Meters Come to Minneapolis

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Minneapolis Might Have to Pay an Extra $25 Million for Target Center Renovation

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nba.com
The $97 $99 $129 million renovation should keep the Twolves around for the next 20 years

The $100 million Target Center renovation is going to cost $30 million more than originally estimated, and tomorrow the Minneapolis City Council will debate covering most of the increase.

The reworked deal leaves the city on the hook for $74 million of the $129 million project, with the Timberwolves kicking in $49 million and AEG, the company running day-to-day operations, putting up $6 million.

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Here's Where Minneapolis's New Protected Bike Lanes Will Be

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City of Minneapolis
More than five miles of protected bike lanes will be added this summer

Minneapolis's evolution into a two-wheeled utopia is nearly complete.

The city is spending $790,000 to add seven-foot-wide bike lanes protected by a 3-7-foot buffer area and hard plastic cones to five busy streets this summer.

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Timelapse Video Shows Minneapolis' Downtown Riverfront Transform Over 20+ Years

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Screenshots of Mill City Times on YouTube
Two decades of riverfront transformation

Downtown Minneapolis nowadays is a cacophony of construction transforming the skyline and reshaping the riverfront. As the development spree barrels forward it's interesting to look back and marvel at how far we've come.

David Tinjum over at the Mill City Times just put together a timelapse video starting with the mostly barren Downtown East/Mill District neighborhood in 1991, then fast-forwarding to the rapid development of 2003-2014.

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Downtown Minneapolis Is America's Best -- Almost

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Andrew Ciscel via Wikipedia
Minneapolis's urban center takes a backseat to no one -- except Pittsburgh -- in a recent national ranking.

Walkability. An array of entertainment options. Light rail. Parks and gardens.

These were just a few of the things that put Minneapolis in rarefied air in a recent ranking of the best downtowns in America.

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Three Miles of New Protected Bike Lanes Planned Parallel to Midtown Greenway [UPDATE]

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City of Minneapolis
The new bike lanes will take away either parking or a lane of motorized traffic

Minneapolis came in an embarrassing third place in the latest rankings of America's best bike cities, and to help fix that Mayor Betsy Hodges ponied up $790,000 for new protected bike lanes in her 2015 budget.

Yesterday the Star Tribune reported that nearly three miles of protected bike lanes are being recommended for East 26th and 28th Streets between Portland and Hiawatha when those streets are repaved this summer.

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Washington Avenue to Get Protected Bike Lanes


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Nicole Curtis Be Damned: Historic Uptown House Has Been Demolished

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Ben Johnson
A four-story apartment building will be built in its place
UPDATE: Soon after the demolition of the Orth House, Nicole Curtis' fans took to Facebook to express their feelings about the issue in a negative way towards City Council Member Lisa Bender, prompting Minneapolis Mayor Betsy Hodges to call out Curtis publicly.

It's over, folks. Yesterday a wrecking crew began leveling the historic home at 2320 Colfax Ave. S. in Minneapolis's Wedge neighborhood.

Last year a developer planning a four-story apartment building won the long, drama-filled battle over the 1893 structure known as the Orth House, which was built by renowned architect T.P. Healy.

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Minneapolis Green-Lights Demolition of Historic Wedge Home

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