Mpls City Council approves Lyft/UberX regulations; Blong Yang casts sole nay vote

Lyft_Pink_Mustache.jpg
Lyft and its mustachioed cars are now legit in Minneapolis.
This morning, the Minneapolis City Council approved an ordinance regulating so-called Transportation Network Companies like Lyft and UberX .

Council also approved changes to the city's taxi ordinance that deregulate cab companies to an extent in hopes they'll be able to compete with the new TNCs.

See also:
Mpls cab companies not thrilled about impending Lyft/UberX ordinance


More »

Minneapolis officials advance Lyft/UberX ordinance despite taxi company objections

mplsCab.jpg
Ernesto De Quesada on Flickr
Yesterday, the Minneapolis Community Development & Regulatory Services Committee unanimously approved a new ordinance that will regulate so-called "transportation network companies" like Lyft and UberX, along with changes to the city's taxi ordinance.

The vote means the package of new regulations heads to the full City Council, which could give its final approval next Friday.

See also:
Despite Commerce Department warning, Jacob Frey says Uber/Lyft ordinance still on its way


More »

Mpls cab companies not thrilled about impending Lyft/UberX ordinance

LyftFreyFeat.jpg
Frey on Lyft and UberX: "I think the taxi industry needed some competition."
This week, the Minneapolis City Council Transportation and Public Works Committee will get its first crack at the city's revised taxi regulations and its brand-new "Transportation Network Companies" ordinance. If they approve it, it'll head to the full council for consideration during next week's meeting.

But the author of the TNC ordinance, council member Jacob Frey, acknowledges that even as the city plans to get serious about regulating TNCs and deregulating cabs, "I don't know I can say [taxi companies] are on board with the ordinance at this point."

See also:
St. Paul also plans to regulate Lyft, UberX


More »

Minneapolis likely to make it more difficult to run for mayor

BallotCostume.jpg
@Mrao_Strib
Dressing up as the Minneapolis mayoral ballot for Halloween will likely be a lot less fun in future years.

That's because city officials are considering raising fees for running for office from $20 for all offices to $100 for city council seats and $250 for mayor.

See also:
St. Paul mayoral forum is a clown show [VIDEO]


More »

Pit bulls, Rottweilers now adoptable from Minneapolis Animal Control for first time

rottweilers.jpg
hernan.mojarro on Flickr
Rottweiler puppies.
As of today, for the first time ever, all dog breeds, including pit bulls and Rottweilers, are now directly adoptable from Minneapolis Animal Control.

Up until now, so-called "bully breed" dogs that came into Animal Control's possession had to be placed with third-party rescue groups before they could be adopted. An ordinance that went into effect today eliminates the middle man, though Minneapolis will continue to place dogs that aren't adopted in rescue facilities.

See also:
Pit bull saves 4-year-old Minneapolis boy [PHOTO]


More »

Despite Commerce Department warning, Jacob Frey says Uber/Lyft ordinance still on its way

LyftFreyFeat.jpg
Frey: "The draft ordinance is still being rejiggered, but I think we're at a pretty good place where we can kinda fine-tune it."
A few weeks ago, the Minnesota Commerce Department issued a warning to folks considering using so-called "transportation network companies" like Lyft or Uber.

"The Commerce Department wants Minnesotans to know that there may be gaps in auto insurance coverage for both the drivers and passengers using TNCs," the department said in a statement. "There may not be coverage for an accident because most personal auto insurance policies contain exclusions when drivers use their personal cars for a commercial (business) purpose. For example, if you participate in a regular, non-business car pool, you would be covered. If you charge passengers a fee, you may not be covered if you get into an accident."

See also:
Jacob Frey on Lyft/Uber regulations: "I think the taxi industry needed some competition"


More »

Barb Johnson seconds Andrew Johnson's concerns about Northside policing

barbJohnsonRectSG.jpg
Barb Johnson
Council Member Andrew Johnson was unimpressed with the Minneapolis Police Department's response to a drive-by shooting in north Minneapolis on Saturday afternoon. His concerns are seconded by Council President Barb Johnson, who represents a good swath of the Northside.

"Clearly there's an issue with response times, which are slower [on the Northside] than the rest of the city," Barb Johnson tells us. "I'm actually investigating one real serious one that happened over the weekend where people were out in [Lyndale Avenue North] fighting and it took a long time to get a police response."

See also:
MPD cop isn't in trouble for taking photo of festive U of M women


More »

Council Member Andrew Johnson blasts MPD for laissez faire response to north Mpls drive-by

AndrewJohnsonFacebookPost.jpg
Andrew Johnson on Facebook
:::: UPDATE :::: Barb Johnson seconds Andrew Johnson's concerns about Northside policing

First-term City Council Member Andrew Johnson took to Facebook to blast the Minneapolis Police Department for what he regards as an inadequate response to a drive-by shooting.

Johnson says he was doing some volunteer work in north Minneapolis Saturday afternoon when shots rang out a short distance away. He was surprised by how long it took for police officers to get there and how casually they behaved once they arrived, but the MPD says Johnson exaggerated the facts of the matter.

See also:
Barb Johnson unloads on Mpls officials for investing in studies, not core issues [VIDEO]


More »

Mpls backtracks on "Clean Zone"; ACLU says lawsuit is in limbo

ASGhype.jpeg
Now featuring less Clean Zone!
A day after the ACLU announced federal lawsuit against the city of Minneapolis, the City Council attempted to address those concerns by watering down its "Clean Zone" resolution.

The original resolution approved by council in February appeared to give Major League Baseball veto power over the permitting process for a range of downtown activities and displays -- including parades, signs, and block events -- during a two-week stretch surrounding this summer's All-Star Game at Target Field. That prompted a lawsuit from the ACLU, which argues the city has no grounds for signing over its permitting process to a for-profit business.

See also:
Sauk Rapids satirist Dan McCall defeats the NSA


More »

ACLU sues Mpls, says All-Star Game "Clean Zone" is more restrictive than 2008 RNC

acluASG.jpg
"It's mind boggling," ACLU director Samuelson says. "We would like the city to obey the constitution, that's all."
:::: UPDATE :::: Mpls backtracks on "Clean Zone"; ACLU says lawsuit is in limbo

The ACLU-MN is suing the city of Minneapolis, Mayor Betsy Hodges, and Police Chief JaneƩ Harteau for granting Major League Baseball's request to create a potentially speech-limiting "Clean Zone" around Target Field during a two-week stretch surrounding this summer's All-Star Game.

The lawsuit's core argument is that Minneapolis officials have no grounds for essentially granting the MLB veto power over things such as banners, signs, block events, or parades. But an ordinance approved by the City Council in February does just that for a huge swath of the city (basically all of downtown and some surrounding areas) over an unreasonably lengthy period of time.

See also:
ACLU blasts Mpls Council for approving speech-limiting "Clean Zone" during All-Star Game


More »

Now Trending

From the Vault

 

Loading...