St. Paul police roughly arrest black man sitting in skyway [VIDEO]

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Chris Lollie
:::: UPDATE :::: We spoke with the man in the video, Chris Lollie, and he said he's fine with us using his real name and unedited mugshot (visible above).

A cell phone video posted to YouTube this week shows a St. Paul police officer roughing up a black man who was apparently doing nothing more than sitting in the skyway, waiting to pick up his kids.

At 9:43 a.m. on January 31, police were summoned to the skyway in downtown St. Paul's First National Bank Building on a report of a man loitering. The video footage shows an officer asking the then-27-year-old man to provide his name.

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St. Paul PD investigating funny meme pic of officer and passed out man


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St. Paul map shows how I-94 cut through heart of city's African-American neighborhood

Categories: Racism, St. Paul
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Minnesota Historical Society
I-94, during its early days, looking east toward from Midway toward downtown St. Paul.
Yesterday, we told you about the map cartographer Geoff Maas put together showing how Minneapolis's interstate highways cut through what were (and to a large extent still are) some of the city's poorest neighborhoods.

To commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act, Maas recently gave St. Paul the same treatment. As you'd probably expect, the same conclusions hold true, though the severing of St. Paul's Rondo neighborhood provides perhaps the starkest example of how interstates disproportionately affected poor (and often minority) Twin Cities communities.

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St. Paul streetcar: Council member would rather give each business $1 million than build line


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"Racist" Twin Cities maps make point about interstate highways [IMAGES]

Categories: Racism
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:::: UPDATE :::: St. Paul map shows how I-94 cut through heart of city's African-American neighborhood [IMAGES]

The "super racist" Minneapolis map we wrote about last month is actually intended to make a point about America's interstate highway system, Geoff Maas, the cartographer who put it together, tells us.

By overlaying maps created in 1935 by sociologist Dr. Calvin Schmid for a study entitled, "Saga of Two Cities: An Ecological and Statistical Study of Social Trends in Minneapolis and St. Paul," with more recent maps of the interstate highway system, Maas aimed to show how interstates were built to bisect some of Minneapolis and St. Paul's poorest neighborhoods.

See also:
Judgmental Mpls neighborhood map might offend you, will probably make you laugh [IMAGE]


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Check out this super racist Minneapolis map from 1935 [IMAGE]

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In some ways, 80 years makes a big difference. In other ways, not much has changed.
-- Update at bottom --

Last week, Council Member Jacob Frey posted a really racist Minneapolis "Planning Area Designation" map to his Facebook page. (But as Minneapolis historian Kirsten Delegard tells us on Twitter, the map is descriptive, not prescriptive, so it's not correct to call it a "planning map.")

In north Minneapolis, the map designates a "Negro Section (Largest in city)." That area is in the same general vicinity as one of the map's handful of "Slum" sections. There are also areas labeled "Foreign Born," "Working Men's Homes," and "Hobohemia." On the flipside, the affluent southwest part of town is labeled, "Gold Coast."

See also:
Judgmental Mpls neighborhood map might offend you, will probably make you laugh [IMAGE]

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Betty McCollum calls on Zygi Wilf to publicly condemn Redskins nickname

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McCollum to Wilf: "The time for debate has ended -- the name of the Washington franchise is clearly an offensive racial slur."
One surprising revelation in Chris Kluwe's nuclear account of alleged homophobia within the Vikings organization is that Zygi Wilf is actually a staunch supporter of gay rights.

Kluwe wrote that before a September 2012 game, right as the marriage amendment he was so outspoken in opposing was becoming a huge political issue in Minnesota, Wilf approached him and said, "Chris, I'm proud of what you've done. Please feel free to keep speaking out. I just came from my son's best friend's wedding to his partner in New York, and it was one of the most beautiful things I've ever seen." (The results of the Vikings' investigation into Kluwe's allegations are set to be revealed next week, so stay tuned for more on that story soon.)

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The Twins once had a racist owner too, and his statue stands outside Target Field


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Rush Limbaugh on MN's "Asian carp" ban: "Political correctness is just going nuts"

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The Minnesota Senate recently approved legislation to remove the term "Asian carp" from statute. As we reported in March, the effort, spearheaded by Sen. John Hoffman (D-Champlin), is a response to concerns that "Asian carp" paints Asian people in a negative light.

But during his radio show yesterday, Rush Limbaugh expressed a very different type of worry -- one about how sensitive our public discourse has become (though expressed a bit more gruffly than that).

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Bill banning "Asian carp" advances; Asian leaders say term is offensive



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Red Wing, not Mpls, is first MN city to scrap Columbus Day

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Red Wing no longer recognizes Columbus at all. Minneapolis didn't go quite as far.
The Minneapolis City Council recently approved a resolution renaming Columbus Day as Indigenous Peoples Day on all officials city communication.

Minneapolis hasn't scrapped Columbus Day altogether, though. Going forward, the city will jointly recognize Columbus Day and Indigenous Peoples Day on the second Monday in October, as that allows the city to avoid the trouble of having to rewrite city contracts that make specific reference to the controversial federal holiday.

See also:
Minnesota is one of the least racist states, according to Google (and Harvard)


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The Twins once had a racist owner too, and his statue stands outside Target Field

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Rick Prescott
Calvin Griffith is immortalized with this statue outside Target Field.
-- Update at bottom --

In light of the furor Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling generated with racist remarks he made during a recent phone conversation with his girlfriend (listen to the audio here), it's worth noting that the Minnesota Twins once had a racist owner as well.

In 1978, Calvin Griffith, owner of the Twins from the franchise's inception until 1984, told members of the Waseca Lions Club that he moved the team from Washington, D.C. to Minnesota because there are relatively few black people here.

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Target sued over ludicrously racist training document


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U of M's Julian Marshall surprised by public health implications of race-air pollution study

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Twin Cities NO2 map
The more yellow an area, the higher the nitrogen dioxide levels. Orange depicts particularly high concentrations.
Because people of color tend to live near highways or power plants, they're exposed to a lot more nitrogen dioxide than whites, a new study finds. As a result, there are about 7,000 heart disease deaths in America each year that wouldn't happen if nonwhites were exposed to the same NO2 levels as whites.

That dramatic finding surprised University of Minnesota environmental engineering professor Julian Marshall, who coauthored "National Patterns in Environmental Injustice and Inequality: Outdoor NO2 Air Pollution in the United States" along with Lara Clark and Dylan Millet.

See also:
Mpls air pollution affects blacks more than whites, U of M study finds


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Mpls air pollution affects blacks more than whites, U of M study finds

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Predominantly nonwhite neighborhoods near power plants or busy highways have particularly polluted air, the study finds.
:::: UPDATE :::: U of M's Julian Marshall surprised by public health implications of race-air pollution study

A study recently put together by a group of environmental scientists at the University of Minnesota finds that people of color living in American cities are exposed to a lot more air pollution than urban whites.

The research, which overlays census and air-quality data, finds that the correlation between race and the amount of nitrogen dioxide a person is exposed to is stronger than the correlation between between exposure and income. (Read the study here.)

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Cocaine, antidepressants found in roughly one-third of Minnesota lakes, study finds


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