Best of Dressing Room: March 23-27

Categories: Weekly Wrap-up

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Folks in the Twin Cities are always up to something exciting. Here are some of Dressing Room's top stories from this week:

-- Open Streets Minneapolis announced dates and locations via Twitter this week.

-- Scott Heins chatted with us about some amazing shots he took of the Pillsbury A-Mill.

-- The Walker are bringing Batman and Christopher Nolan to its Dialogue and Retrospective Series.

-- We chatted with folks behind Twin Cities Hit Show, a new local morning show.

The Debutante's Ball Offers Mix of Filipino, Minnesota Culture

Categories: Theater

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Photo by Scott Pakudaitis
The young actors in The Debutante's Ball
While not perfect, Eric "Pogi" Sumangil's The Debutante's Ball offers many delights, giving us an engaging group of young characters as they walk the line between American and Filipino cultures.

The play centers on the titular ball, which has been a longstanding tradition in the Twin Cities Filipino community. The three young women all have their reasons for participating, as do the three young men who will be their escorts.

See also:
God Girl Explores Ugly Side of Seminary Life


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Freshwater Theatre Explores Memory in Two Shows Opening This Weekend

Categories: Theater
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Freshwater Theatre Company continues its season-long investigation into memory with two shows opening this weekend. Running in repertory, Jenna Zark's If You Don't Weaken follows a woman seeking to mourn her grandfather, and Recollection Collection is a series of short plays. Both look at how memory affects our lives.

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Drag Queens, 30 Days of Biking, Little Free Libraries: Freeloader Friday

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This week in free stuff to do we have drag-queen performances, a super awesome happy hour, and a party for Little Free Libraries.

Come take a look and plan your weekend on the cheap.

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Blood and Funding: Experimental Artist Ron Athey Reflects on the Culture Wars

Categories: Performing Arts
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Ron Athey in performance
Kurt Ehrmann
This weekend, the Walker Art Center, the University of Minnesota, and Patrick's Cabaret are taking a look back at the infamous piece performance artist Ron Athey did at Patrick's Cabaret 21 years ago. Sponsored by the Walker Art Center, the work was presented at the height of the AIDS crisis. "Four Scenes in a Harsh Life" involved flesh incisions and blood-soaked cloths raised into the air. It shocked audiences, and caused a national outcry. There was a call for censorship by the likes of Jesse Helms, and other conservatives were hell bent on getting rid of public funding for the arts.

This week, the Culture Wars: Then and Now begins with a discussion at the Walker Art Center tonight. It will feature Ron Athey, as well as former Walker Art Center curator John Killacky and art historian Jennifer Doyle. Feminist/queer theory scholar and art historian Lauren DeLand will moderate. On Friday, the University will be holding a symposium during the day, and over at Patrick's Cabaret local artists will investigate themes of censorship, contemporary queer aesthetics, and radical embodied performance on Friday and Saturday.

In anticipation for this weekend's events, we chatted with Ron Athey.


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Twin Cities Hit Show Offers a New Take on Morning Shows

Categories: Internet
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L-R: Rusty Gatenby, Chuck Gollop, guest Tim Mahoney, Courtney McClean
What happens when you lock a well-known local media personality, a former cop, and a hippie in a recording studio with no rules or restrictions? That is the question being answered every morning during the Twin Cities Hit Show.

Monday through Friday, former KSTP reporter Rusty Gatenby, policeman-turned-comedian Chuck Gollop, and naughtybilly pioneer Courtney McClean host a live podcast unlike any morning show you'll find on "terrestrial" radio. 

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Two Generations, One Actress: Sutton Foster on Her Empowering Role in Younger

Categories: Film and TV

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TV Land
Sutton Foster
Doing everything right in one generation just makes you old-fashioned, even obsolete, in the next. That’s the harsh reality that confronts 40-year-old Liza — played with spirited, sarcastic élan by Tony-winning actress Sutton Foster — when she attempts to re-enter the workforce after a decade and a half of stay-at-home motherhood. Finding herself shut out of the industry where she’d once been hailed as a wunderkind, Liza passes herself off as a 26-year-old to start again at the bottom of the publishing ladder in the peppy and observant Younger, the new sitcom from Sex and the City creator Darren Star.


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Dim Media Collaborates with Angel Hawari at ditch. Gallery

Categories: Art
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Sacred Seer (detail)
Multimedia arts group Dim Media opens a new show this Thursday called "Desiderium Vulgaris," which translates from Latin to mean "circumstances of the human condition." The exhibition, presented by ditch. Gallery, highlights the group's focus on collaborative processes, with a particular theme of graffiti and urban art. 


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Five Examples of Great Dissident Cinema from Around the World Streaming Online

Categories: Art, TV and Film
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It's probably a good idea to not put too much stock in the Oscars, but it was great to see the Academy give its prize for best documentary to Laura Poitras's Citizenfour. The film, which chronicles the Edward Snowden leaks with the nerve-wracking suspense of a classic spy thriller, is a worthy entry in the heroic tradition of dissident cinema from around the globe.

To dig deeper into this subject, here are five examples, both fiction and documentary, of superior dissident films.

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The Nature Crown Offers a Forest of Whimsy, Humor and Heart at the Guthrie

Categories: Theater

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Bill Cameron
For Theatre Forever founder and director Jon Ferguson, The Nature Crown is an intensely personal piece about summers spent in the north of England and the youthful adventures of his grandfather. For the rest of us, the new show is a whimsical and often touching ride into the real and imaginary worlds of our own lives.

The play is British to its tea-drinking core, but it connects with emotions that most people feel: that they've lost a connection to the person they were as a child and to the place where they grew up.


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