The Moving Company Recreates Love's Labour's Lost

Categories: Theater

LovesLaboursLost.jpg
Photo by Richard Tyler Rowley.
Nathan Keepers, Heidi Bakke, and Steven Epp.
The Moving Company brings Shakespeare's early play Love's Labour's Lost to the Lab Theater starting this week. While it retains the title, you won't find much of the original play inside.

Instead, the fast-paced production includes lines from all 37 of Shakespeare's plays, from the romance of As You Like It to the tragedy of King Lear to the whatever-the-hell-it-is of Titus Andronicus.

See also:
Moving Company Ready to Unload the Lab in
For Sale

More »

CTC's Grinch Still Brings Holiday Cheer

Categories: Theater

Grinch2014.jpg
Photo by Dan Norman
Brandon Brooks and Reed Sigmund.
The holiday season has plenty of traditions, especially at local theaters. While the Children's Theatre Company doesn't present Dr. Seuss's How the Grinch Stole Christmas every year, it is usually a welcome addition to the schedule.

This year is no exception, with a fast-paced adventure that unfolds like a Technicolor-fueled dream, buoyed by a well-honed script and songs, and deepened by a cascade of delightful performances.

See also:
Sonja Parks Makes a Neighborhood Come Alive in
Seedfolks

More »

Relics Misses Opportunities in Far-Future Look at Our Modern World

Categories: Theater

theater111914.jpg

Everyone loves a good apocalypse story — the Rapture, a zombifying plague, a planet of highly intelligent and pissed-off apes.

Relics, a new experimental work presented at the Guthrie's Dowling Studio, takes us to a post-apocalyptic society 300 years in the future, on the anniversary of "The Great Wipe," which, we are told, annihilated our society and destroyed all records of its existence. Here, a museum exhibit is about to open, packed with artifacts from long-lost 2014.

This is a progressive production: The audience travels through the exhibit, visiting several chambers along the way to the finale, where the sacred rites of this lost society are on display. Think of it as a haunted house, but instead of scares there is a mystery: What has happened to our 2014 way of life, and what kind of world do our descendants inhabit?

See also: Relics Offers Futuristic Look at the PresentMore »

Nat Fuller Ready for Latest Turn in A Christmas Carol

Categories: Theater

ChristmasCarol.jpg
Photo by Michal Daniel
Nat Fuller played Scrooge at the Guthrie Theater for several years during the 1990s. He has appeared in nearly every production of A Christmas Carol since 1988.
For the past quarter century, Nat Fuller has spent his holidays onstage in the Guthrie Theater's annual A Christmas Carol.

In that time, he has played practically every male role in the show, from the man who knocks on Scrooge's door to ask for money for the poor to the great miser himself.

See also:
Relics Offers Futuristic Look at the Present


More »

On Golden Pond Offers Treat of Veteran Actors Onstage

Categories: Theater

OnGoldenPond2.jpg
Photo by Michal Daniel
Bain Boehlke and Wendy Lehr.
At this point, most people are as familiar with parodies of Katherine Hepburn's performance in On Golden Pond as they are of the film -- let alone Ernest Thompson's original play.

The Jungle's Bain Boehlke has brought Thompson's ode to aging and the persistence of love out for the holiday season. As an added gift, Boehlke is joined by Wendy Lehr to play the two leads, Norman and Ethel Thayer.

See also:
Longtime Friends Bain Boehlke and Wendy Lehr Slip Into
On Golden Pond Roles

More »

Relics Offers Futuristic Look at the Present

Categories: Theater

Relics.jpg
Photo by Nick Golfis
Starting Friday, you will have a chance to take a veritable time machine to a world 300 years in the future. All you need to do is take one of the two elevators to the ninth floor of the Guthrie Theater.

There, a team of artists and performers will present Relics. The conceit? You are attending a gala opening for a new exhibit centered on recently uncovered artifacts from the far-flung past: 2014, to be exact.

See also:
The White Snake Showcases What Great Theater Can Do

More »

Right Here Showcase Highlights Minnesota-Based Performers

GADU.jpg
Gadu
Paul Herwig, co-artistic director of Off-Leash Area, presents a brand-new showcase of local performing talent at the JSB Tek Box this weekend and next. The artists, who come from various disciplines within the performing arts, were given a stipend to create new works or re-envision current works. This weekend's The Right Here Showcase features performances by puppet theater artist Bart Buch, Butoh dance performance artist Gadu DouShin, and contemporary dance artist Deborah Jinza Thayer. The following week's show will offer contemporary dance with Rosy Simas, and Vanessa Voskuil will present alongside multidisciplinary theater artist Kym Longhi. We talked to Paul Herwig over email about the new project. 


More »

Anti-Musical Killer Inside Pulls No Punches About Life in Prison

Categories: Theater

KillerINsidetheater1.jpg

Lots of folks hate musicals. They can't accept the logic of people breaking into song in a way that would only get stares if done on the street. They don't like the persistently perky stories or the material seemingly drawn from every hit movie of the past 30 years.

It's not hard to refute those arguments. If you can accept a wise-cracking dude in high-tech armor laying waste to New York City, it's not much of a stretch to watch Maria unleashing "Tonight" in West Side Story. Plenty of musicals deal with heavy topics and find startling new layers in old works.

More »

The Juniper Tree: Cannibalism Can Be Fun(ny)

Categories: Theater

JuniperTree.jpg
Photo by Mark Vancleave
Robert Rosen flashes a gang sign in The Juniper Tree.
Nothing says "children's fairy tale" like a story featuring insane jealousy, murder, and unintentional cannibalism.

The Juniper Tree has all three. The Grimm fairy tale has come back to life at Open Eye Figure Theatre, and it's a funny absolute delight. No, honestly.

See also:
Kevin Kling Heals with
Sound in Hammer, Anvil, and Stirrup


More »

Murder Mysteries: Heavenly Horrors

Categories: Theater

MurderMysteries.jpg
Image courtesy of Shadow Horse Theatre
I've been a longtime fan of Neil Gaiman, going all the way back to the first issue of Sandman, and through all of the graphic novels, short stories, and novels that have come in the decades since.

I've also always loved "Murder Mysteries," both in its original short-story version and the later audio drama starring Brian Dennehy and Michael Emerson. Gaiman plays with favorite themes, like supernatural beings with very human problems, in a multi-layered, engrossing, and eventually horrifying story.

See also:
"Crazyface" Showcases Horror Master Clive Barker


More »
Loading...