Local Foragers Release New Field Guide to Mushrooms of the Upper Midwest

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Tammy Kimbler
King Bolete

The upper Midwest is a haven for mushroom hunters and fall is an excellent time to hunt. The Hot Dish spent this past weekend with expert foragers Kathy Yerich and Teresa Marrone, who recently co-authored a pocket field guide, Mushrooms of the Upper Midwest: A Simple Guide to Common Mushrooms. The guide details nearly 400 common mushroom varieties found between the Dakotas and Indiana, and while 400 is far from a complete guide (there are over 4,000 cataloged species in this area alone), the book is well organized into easy-to-use sections starting with "Top Edibles" and "Top Toxics," followed by a detailed identification guide.

The guide's high quality photos, easy-to-understand descriptions, and habitat keys will have beginners and experts alike wanting this book in their back pocket.

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The Forager Chef on mushroom hunting and almost poisoning himself [VIDEO]

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A seasonal guide to pickle-worthy produce in the Twin Cities, with recipes

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thebittenword.com

Twin Cities farmers markets are bursting at the seams with late summer and early fall produce. Now is the time to stock up on the best fruits and vegetables of the season, and preserve them for those dark days of winter. Radishes, carrots, peppers, beets, turnips, cucumbers, cabbages, garlic, onions, and green beans are prolific, and pickling is one of the easiest ways to preserve produce. We asked local bloggers, farmers, cooks, and producers for their pickling faves, all available now at your local farmers markets.

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A taste tour of the Karmel Square Somali Mall

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The Nokomis Farmers Market finishes its maiden season this week

Categories: Farmers Markets

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Look for the bright orange signs at 52nd and Chicago...

With just three market dates, the Nokomis Farmers Market debuted on a trial basis this summer. Offering a mid-week evening market in June, July, and August, this south Minneapolis venture is definitely bringing the neighborhood out to eat, shop, and be merry, but the final installment this Wednesday will be the true test. Will this fledgling market find its way? Here's our take on the new kid on the block.

See also:
The small but mighty Kingfield Farmers Market

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Little Mekong Night Market: Street food and art in a carnival candy shell

Categories: Farmers Markets

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Tammy Kimbler

The Little Mekong Night Market is the new sparkling jewel of the summer. Nestled near the Western Green Line light rail station in St. Paul, the market is a feast for your senses, filled with delicious street food, local purveyors, arts, crafts, entertainment, and family-friendly activities.

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Minneapolis Farmers Market on the Mall brings fresh fare to downtown set

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Minneapolis Farmers Market on the Mall brings fresh fare to downtown set

Categories: Farmers Markets

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Marsha Trainer
You gotta love the hustle of the Minneapolis Market on the Mall

While the artisanal farmers markets in our beloved Twin Cities are ridiculously charming, there is also a certain beauty to serving a wide swath of diverse people with a large selection of vegetables, goods, and bargains in a convenient location. That's where the Minneapolis Farmers Market on the Mall shines. As many as 60 vendors set up shop each Thursday smack in the middle of downtown Minneapolis and give busy professionals, convention center visitors, and everyone else wandering around Nicollet Mall a chance to pick up their fresh produce, herbs, and other items.

Sure, the Nicollet Mall Market can be lively and there are vendors who resell produce. But, if you embrace it, you just might find a cheap, healthy snack, a swell local seller, and a way to avoid yet another trip to the grocery store -- all during your coffee break.

See also:
The Mill City Farmers Market: Strawberries, heirloom plants, Chef Shack donuts and more


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The St. Paul Farmers Market in Lowertown: The urban locavore's dream

Categories: Farmers Markets

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Marsha Trainer
Step off the sidewalk and into the St. Paul Farmers Market
The greater Twin Cities boasts a wealth of farmers markets in all shapes and sizes. Some are hip, some suburban, and others sprawl across huge expanses of macadam -- but each one owes a debt to the original upper Midwest growers' venue: the St. Paul Farmers Market.

Established in 1853 at Seventh and Wabasha Streets, the farmers market has moved frequently, but has always been in the downtown area of the city. These days, it's an urban oasis overflowing with flowers, berries, vegetables, meats, treats, honey, jellies, soaps, breads, sauces, salsas, live music, and even a joke-telling balloon animal maker. But don't be fooled by the sheer number of vendors -- all of the produce and related products are homegrown and home-produced by individually owned businesses. There's no reselling of items allowed, making the market a locavore's paradise with just the right amount of St. Paul's signature low-key friendliness.

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The small but mighty Kingfield Farmers Market: Sauerkraut, doughnuts, honey, and more


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The Mill City Farmers Market: Strawberries, heirloom plants, Chef Shack donuts, and more

Categories: Farmers Markets

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Grant Tillery
Saturnine skies don't stop farmers market fanatics.

Remember when that couple in Portlandia tracks down the exact origins -- and name -- of the chicken they order at a restaurant? Mill City is that kind of farmers market, one where customers want to know the name and life story of their poultry (and sometimes produce) and the vendors are eager to share. 

See also:
The small but mighty Kingfield Farmers Market: Sauerkraut, doughnuts, honey, and more


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The small but mighty Kingfield Farmers Market: Sauerkraut, doughnuts, honey, and more

Categories: Farmers Markets
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Some of the market's young customers

The weather is warm and the crops are finally coming in. Rhubarb and seedlings are the order of the day, but it won't be long before we'll see sugar snap peas and berries at the vendors' stands.

The Hot Dish is setting out to explore area farmers markets and their unique offerings. First stop: Kingfield Farmers Market, a kid-friendly market where both Foxy Falafel and Bogart's Doughnuts got their start.

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New law eases food sampling restrictions at farmers markets


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New law eases food sampling restrictions at farmers markets

Categories: Farmers Markets

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Hannah Sayle

Recent legislation could make your farmers market experience a little less intimidating and a whole lot tastier.

The new law, which Governor Dayton approved earlier this month, will allow for cooking demonstrations and more extensive food sampling at farmers markets across the state. Formerly, local growers, artisans, and producers could only share unaltered samples of their products -- even a sprinkle of salt on a slice of locally grown tomato was verboten. Cooking demonstrations with samples were similarly off limits.

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Tricia Cornell on how to shop Minnesota's farmers markets like a pro [RECIPE]

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Tricia Cornell on how to shop Minnesota's farmers markets like a pro [RECIPE]

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The Minnesota Farmers Market Cookbook by Tricia Cornell

It seems like a shopping no-brainer: instead of getting in your gas guzzler and motoring across town to a big box grocery store for your imported asparagus from Peru or heads of garlic from China, you spend your hard-earned food budget at your neighborhood farmers market, supporting the farmers who live and work near you, and getting the best quality produce you can. So why are so many people intimidated by the farmers market, and so few see it as a legitimate place to shop and feed their families?

Tricia Cornell tackles this question in her latest book, The Minnesota Farmers Market Cookbook. Brimming with easy to accomplish recipes, the book also includes a comprehensive directory of farmers markets throughout the region, and helpful notes on each type of produce covered, so you can shop and cook with confidence. She took the time to chat with us about kohlrabi, the lies we've been told about stir fries, and all of her best tips for shopping locally like a pro.

The Hot Dish: Describe your new cookbook. What should readers expect?

Tricia Cornell: The most exciting thing about The Minnesota Farmers Market Cookbook is that it's organized by product, so that you can experience it the same way you experience the farmers market. You can either start at the beginning of a row and walk all the way through, or you can drop in and see what you see in front of you, or you can go straight to the beets if you need beets. So the book is organized that same way.

HD: Why did you decide to write this book? Your previous book, Eat More Vegetables, tackles the questions of what to do with your seasonal produce. How does this book differ from or expand on the first?

Well, that book was also a lot of fun to write. That was 100% my recipes and the foods that my family eats at home. This book allowed me to talk to a lot of really dedicated farmers and chefs, some of them practically celebrities here in Minnesota and some them ordinary farmers market fellows. And the other thing is that this book allowed me to get really in depth and geeky on each vegetable in a way that I wasn't able to do so much in the first book. I take you through how to find a vegetable, when to buy it, what to when you get it home, how to store it...So, yeah, it's a little geekier on the vegetable front.

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