Mumford & Sons' so-called "indefinite hiatus" is total cliffhanger bullshit

Marcus_Mumford_Tony_Nelson.jpg
Photo by Tony Nelson
Mumford & Sons at Xcel Energy Center, in September of 2013.
The biggest Mumford & Sons hit single to date is about patiently waiting. Now it's everyone else's turn. Just as they've become one of the most prominent live draws in the U.S., the English group is reportedly shutting down for an indefinite period of time.

To the joy of the haters and the sorrow of their fervent followers, this break could be a month, it could be a decade, or it could be (gasp) forever. But that last option's just not going to happen. Sigh no more: There will most likely be more Mumfy long before Barack Obama ends his second term and Dr. Seuss aficionado Ted Cruz becomes our next U.S. president.

After the band wrapped their tour in Kansas last week, keyboardist Ben Lovett told Rolling Stone, "There won't be any Mumford & Sons activities for the foreseeable future."  And with those words, he triggered questions of how long they would be gone. "We have no idea," he continued. "We just know we're going to take a considerable amount of time off." And as long as folks keep considering, Mumford is pleased.

Sure, there are medical and family reasons that force an artist's hand when deciding to take a rest. But if a group hasn't broken up, and they just have "no timetable," this is often a manipulative (and successful) framing of the most common of events in the life of rock stars. Plus, they're way too young -- Mumford is only 26 -- and so united by strong Christian beliefs to actually disband.

The whole announcing of an "indefinite career hiatus" thing is pretty much PR bullshit most of the time. Instead of just, you know, "working on new ideas," "recharging the batteries after our tour," or whatever an artist can say after they finished something that made a load of money, it's a carrot dangling from an infinitely lengthening pole. Following Babel's Grammy win, the radio penetration of several Mumford songs, and the brilliant "Hopeless Wanderer" video basically catering to the haters, the band had an unprecedented amount of people listening when they abruptly said, "See ya." They had to say something, but so far this announcement has caused an eruption of pearls-clutching confusion for blogger types. And annoyance for this one.
 

Every time a Mumford fan sings along with their chart-topper "I Will Wait," all the way through, they're repeating the word "wait" 22 times. Conversely, the song also includes the phrase "shake the excess."

A hiatus of any length will seem like forever for one camp and never long enough for the rest of us. But Mumford & Sons have been too intentional about every note, lyric, and public interaction that they've ever created to lead anyone to seriously believe that this is how things end. As the band earnestly strummed through a heart-baring show in St. Paul earlier this month, it was on no one's mind to soak it up while they still could.

A band that has grown to this stadium-filling stature, even in such rapid fashion, would not say farewell without the chance to fully capitalize on it. No way. The financial implications are too huge for an act that made over $6 million in 2012 alone.

Look to one of America's other favorite British bands, Coldplay, for this bait-and-switch hiatus technique in action. In fact, Chris Martin could moonlight as a writer of movie trailer voice-overs with the patently "epic" approach to unveiling his band's inactivity.

"It's going to be a long, long time before you hear a new album from us," he said in October of 2006 after wrapping touring for 2005's X&Y. "We've done a few things, but we're all enjoying having families at the moment. If it takes five years for us to feel ready to record something new, then so be it." As it turned out, it took all of eight months before they commenced recording their follow-up album, Viva la Vida or Death and All His Friends, which was released to widespread attention in June 2008. In November of last year, he was at it again.

And from Trent Reznor to Dave Grohl to Justin Vernon to Paul Westerberg to our very first pop star, Jesus Christ, swooning fans will swoon all the more when they are alerted they will have to wait for something. Especially if they don't know how long they must wait.

In this case, it was an excruciating matter of a few dozen hours before they, well frontman Marcus Mumford, returned.

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22 comments
beyondjupiter
beyondjupiter

They deserve their break after touring for so long. However, they ARE gentlemen of the road, and this is what they love to do. I think they will feel a little bit refreshed, maybe write some new tracks, and hit the road again next year sometime. Maybe or maybe not. I just hope I eventually get more shows to follow around. Then I will be happy. Even if that is in 2016.

MattyK
MattyK

God, I hate this pretentiuous hipster bullshit. 3 years ago when Mumford first showed up on the scene the music snobs were gaga over them. As soon as High School kids start listening to the same music, the band suddenly becomes detestable. Like the joke goes: how many hipsters can you fit in a phone booth? One, because any more and it becomes too mainstream.

McHale Ann
McHale Ann

I get that some people don't like certain bands, but that doesn't mean that anyone should just piss on others for having their own opinions. OMG, they don't agree with me so they must be the worst person alive. Most of the people on here are no better than the mean girl/jock in school that they claimed picked on them for not wanting to make out with a boy in front of everyone or for "acting gay". If you don't like them, then be on your way.

zach.pasdoe
zach.pasdoe

Good.  Hopefully the Lumineers and the Avett Brothers are the next to call it quits.

k2yeb
k2yeb topcommenter

This is good news, to me. I prefer my music without so many dashes of hipster and branding. 

Derek McMorrow
Derek McMorrow

Minneapolis is in agreement, these guys are a joke. Do not bring them here.

brennanlee.o
brennanlee.o

Haha great comments on here!   Yes who cares,  a band becomes a sell out and epic fail when they go from playing one of the greatest venue's (1st Avenue) in the world to selling out Target Center or Excel the next year, like  Mumford, The Lumineers (really one fucking song did that), and sorry to say The Black Keys did,  though I still consider The Black Keys a talented pair. As for Mumford and Sons big deal everything they do sounds the same and is becoming way overdone recently,  where is the creativity in music today? 

TwinTown77
TwinTown77

Oh no.  What are all the teenagers and all those who are musically deficient going to do?  The kings of fashion folk are on an indefinite hiatus.  Who cares as bands like Mumford & Sons and the Lumineers are total crap and prime examples of what's wrong with music.

Erik Seavey
Erik Seavey

Who cares about those hipster magnet douchebags?

MaxTimander
MaxTimander

@gimme_noise Couldn't have said it. Hope. Wand. video is for the haters. The only thing I've liked by M&S

Kevin Steinman
Kevin Steinman

Well formulated, Reed. Was actually thinking about this angle on their "hiatus" yesterday.

flyingmonkeyair
flyingmonkeyair

@Evan Hanson Marcus was brought up in a paster's family. The music they play derives a lot from the style of worship music of that church, the South West London Vineyard—the UK HQ of the late John Wimber's Vineyard Christian Fellowship. Jangling guitars with a soft rock vibe.

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