Can I use a band's name after they break up?

Categories: Fan Landers
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Photo by Nick Vlcek
Is the name Lookbook back on the market?

Are you a musician? Is your group having issues? Ask Fan Landers! Critic Jessica Hopper has played in and managed bands, toured internationally, booked shows, produced records, and worked as a publicist, and is the author of The Girls' Guide to Rocking, a how-to for teen ladies. She is here to help you stop doing it wrong. Send your problems to her -- confidentiality is assured, unless you want to use your drama as a ticket to internet microfame.

Dear Fan,
My label released two records by a band that has broken up. I just discovered on Facebook some kid who seems to be a singer-songwriter and is performing under the same name. Just as a heads up I thought I would message this kid [REDACTED], who seems to think it's OK because the type of music he plays is different, and he wants to know if I am coming at him "legally." I don't really have much legally vested interest and I'm pretty sure I care more than the former band does at this point, but it would affect my label in some minor way and dilute any sort of name recognition the band built up. Do I have any legal standing in this, or am I cyber-bullying a stubborn kid?
George

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Fan Landers: Our producer jacked our tracks!

Categories: Fan Landers
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Are you a musician? Is your group having issues? Ask Fan Landers! Critic Jessica Hopper has played in and managed bands, toured internationally, booked shows, produced records, worked as a publicist, and is the author of The Girls' Guide to Rocking, a how-to for teen ladies. Send your problems to her -- confidentiality is assured, unless you want to use your drama as a ticket to Internet microfame.

Hi Fan Landers!
My band just got done recording. We struck a really good deal with a dude who's kind of a freelance engineer, and we appreciated it. But we think he took too much control over our sound. He's a self-professed arena rock aficianado, we're a really grungy band with radical politics. On top of saying shitty things about our lyrics during recording, he didn't listen to our demos at all to know what we sounded like beforehand. Nor did he listen to any examples of music we sent him, so that he'd get an idea of what we wanted to sound like. Now we sound too clean on our recordings. We even went to the studio while he was mixing, but he was moody and rushed through everything. I asked him for the mixes so we could get them mastered by a friend who knows our sound, but he only sent the high bit mixed tracks. What's the etiquette here? I feel that if we paid him hundreds of dollars, we should get the mixes. How do you think we should go about this?
Thanks,
Ungrateful Little Punk


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Fan Landers: Should I publicly out my bandmate as a mooch?

Categories: Fan Landers
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Are you a musician? Is your group having issues? Ask Fan Landers! Critic Jessica Hopper has played in and managed bands, toured internationally, booked shows, produced records, worked as a publicist, and is the author of The Girls' Guide to Rocking, a how-to for teen ladies. Send your problems to her -- confidentiality is assured, unless you want to use your drama as a ticket to Internet microfame.

Dear Fan,
I've been the core of an act with someone for 10-plus years. We were pretty loosey-goosey on the money end of things for a long time, mostly because there wasn't much of it. I was putting up the front money, but I wasn't losing much, so I let it slide. Fast-forward to a couple of years ago when we formalized the business end of things between the two of us -- I leveraged a loan to try and give things another push (in addition to other things I was already covering) and am still not being reimbursed for the other guy's half of expenses. He seems to think his bar tabs even out for the travel and promotional expenses I've laid out for. And while we're on the eve of things getting legal, I've been getting advice from several people to go the "public humiliation" route -- to make him look like the cheap, self-centered guy he really is. I find the suggestion astonishing -- do you see any beneficial reason to proceed in that fashion?
-Anonymous

See Also:
Ask Fan Landers: Either she's your girlfriend or your roadie, not both


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Ask Fan Landers: Either she's your girlfriend or your roadie, not both

Categories: Fan Landers
fanlanders_header.jpg
Are you a musician? Is your group having
issues? Critic Jessica Hopper has played in and managed bands, toured internationally, booked shows, produced records, worked
as a publicist, and is the author of The Girls' Guide to Rocking, a how-to for teen ladies. She is here to help you stop doing it wrong. Send your problems to her; confidentiality is assured, unless you want to use
your drama as a ticket to Internet microfame.

Dear Fan,
I am considering taking my girlfriend on tour with me and my band. In the band it is me and three other guys. It will be a six week jaunt,
we are traveling in a van. I asked the guys in the band if my GF could come, and they all gave a lukewarm "yes." I've heard warnings
about partners on tour and what a bad idea it is, but I figure we could use the help with merch and driving. She isn't super close with the
guys in the band, but she likes them, and they like her. I'm a little worried that having her along may be distracting, but again, the help
that she will provide maybe worth the distraction? What do you think?
-N.B.


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