God bless you, Palmer's Bar

Categories: Nightlife

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Edo

As a born-and-raised, card-carrying south Minneapolis boy, I've finally come to grips with the fact that my Twin Cities have got to be the most insecure major urban metro in the U.S. We're constantly fishing for validation from the larger cultural hubs around the country to feed our low self-esteem, and no matter how much our friends from around the Midwest tell us how pretty or smart we are, their praise is immediately drowned out at the first mention of local interest on CNN.

So every once in a while, a slickster from some big magazine out East will waltz into town, take advantage of our open-armed hospitality, and decide to chronicle their adventures like an anthropologist wading into the bush. They'll take in some sights, marvel at how much life we've carved out of the tundra, scrawl out a quick missive for their editor, and hop back on the plane.


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Franz Diego celebrates the Equinox EP and four years of Turnt Up!

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Away from the bro bars and $12 dollar drink nightspots of downtown Minneapolis, just past the Grain Belt sign and across the river in Northeast Minneapolis, Turnt Up! has become one of the most successful club nights. It has quietly sold out on the second Friday of each month, and a kaleidoscope of fashion and personality line up along NE Hennepin before midnight to jockey for a spot in the imitate Honey.

The three-DJ crew of Noam the Dummer, Gabe Garcia and Willie Shu spin, mix and scratch over a experimental sounds of old school, progressive and new jackness of the urban and dance varieties as a crowd -- that would make the "Rumpshaker" video jealous -- shine in party glory. You can find Franz Diego on the mic hosting and toasting. Basically it's a fun house party without the stale Doritos sitting on the coffee table. 

Gimme Noise spoke to Franz Diego who is busy this week preparing for the party's fourth anniversary bash and is celebrating his new EP project, which was released last week.
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Marquee nightclub cancels plan to relaunch as Hush731

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Nick Patton/North Bass Media
A Friday night at Marquee

Located under Union restaurant, downtown Minneapolis nightclub Marquee is undergoing a rebranding and remodeling effort only 18 months after opening its doors. As of Tuesday, the club was set to be redubbed Hush731.

But the new branding drew heat on social media over its similarity to HUSH, a group of businesses and dance events headed by local techno artist Zak Khutoretsky, better known as internationally renowned DJ DVS1. For now, in a twist you don't see too often, the underground seems to have won this round.


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Rappers and ravers, stop glorifying deadly drugs

Categories: Nightlife, PSA
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Ivan Minsloff
Are ravers the modern day hippies? There are plenty of parallels, from the flower imagery to the PLUR mentality. Then, of course, there's the idea of using drugs as a path to enlightenment. (Or at least, amazing vibes.)

But when it comes to drugs there's a key difference: The hippies were safer. From their weak-ass pot to their LSD, their preferred recreational drugs were less likely to kill you.

See Also: Top 10 rules of the rave: A guide to underground dance party etiquette

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Tags:

EDM, hip hop

TML and Jim Frick's dance party REAL FUN launches Saturday

Categories: Nightlife
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James Frickle and Peter Lansky prepare for REAL FUN

Too Much Love met its end this past Saturday in a sold-out, sweaty and steam-filled Record Room, while the dance party's creator and host Peter Lansky commandeered the decks for one last set as DJ Sovietpanda. Drink tickets hurled by James Frickle of WAK LYF rained down upon revelers seemingly too involved in their grinding and fist-pumping to notice. Within four hours, Lansky took guests on a trip encapsulating seven years worth of sound, traveling deftly from house into disco and finally reaching a crescendo of face-melting techno so loud that it almost drowned out the high-pitched shrieks of those "drunk girls" that LCD Soundsystem sings so fondly of.

So what comes next? Fortunately, club music aficionados need not spend more than this short week grieving the end of an era, as Lansky and Frickle are prepared to launch their brainchild party REAL FUN at the Record Room this coming Saturday.

See Also: Slideshow: Goodbye, Too Much Love

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Seven years of Too Much Love: An oral history

Categories: Nightlife

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Serene Supreme, July 2010.
Partgoer Monique Tenison poses outside of First Ave.

Too Much Love's DJ Sovietpanda, AKA Peter Lansky, has announced plans to end the weekly series on February 1 after a successful seven-year run. Beginning the following Saturday, First Avenue will play host to a new weekly event created by Lansky and friend James Frickle of WAK LYF, that they have christened REAL FUN.

To honor the memories that were created at this epic dance party, Gimme Noise spoke to Lansky and the partygoers who kept the dance floor alive each and every weekend. Here is the story of Too Much Love, told in their words.

See Also: DJ Sovietpanda's Too Much Love to end seven-year run in February

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Why everyone's getting down at the Soap Factory's Into the Void

Categories: Nightlife
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Primarily known as a local violinist with Brute Heart and Myrrh, Jackie Beckey -- AKA DJ Diarrhea -- and co-conspirator Christopher Allen of Bedlam theater fame have created possibly the be-all, end-all of epic holiday time blasts with Into the Void. This Saturday the two and a bevy of talented collaborators are taking over the Soap Factory as part of their Sound On-Site series of collaborative and experimental music events.

Like a real happening, Into the Void promises psychedelic projections and interactive space caves courtesy of Heart of the Beast and a sight specific musical installation by Nona Marie of Dark Dark Dark. It should envelop attendees as pulsing dance music instigates bacchanalian magnificence in the Soap Factory's ever chameleon-like walls.

In between setting up her DJ gear and a bouncy castle for the big night we were able to corner Beckey for a minute to fill us in on what to expect from the unexpected evening.

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Steve Aoki promoter on Epic barricade collapse: No one asked for a refund

Categories: Nightlife
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Photo by Anna Gulbrandsen

Another weekend, another crazy show at Epic. Seven days after a Yo Gotti show ended in tragedy, the downtown Minneapolis club hosted party-hard DJ Steve Aoki. As we now know, the swell of people at the front of the stage was so powerful at the start of his set that it knocked over the front barricade and sent lots of people piling on top of each other.

One person watching with concern was the night's promoter, Sound in Motion's Jack Trash. "I've been throwing parties for 20 years, I worked at First Ave for five years, and I've never seen a surge like the one I saw," he says of Saturday. "It was just insane. Everyone wants to be at the front when he starts. There were a lot of people who had a good time, but it was just crazy for a few minutes."

See Also: Steve Aoki fans crushed during barricade collapse at Epic

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Steve Aoki fans crushed during barricade collapse at Epic

Categories: Nightlife
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Photo by Anna Gulbrandsen

By Matt Scott

Update: Promoter Jack Trash has responded to the incident.

I've been raging my face off at EDM shows for the past four years, and I can say without a doubt that Steve Aoki this past Saturday was the most reckless situation I've yet to experience.

Don't get me wrong -- the show was on legendary levels of awesome. From cannons of confetti to getting blasted in the face by flying cake, the Aokify America Tour (review here) was worth every bruise and every penny. That being said, I'm concerned about the future of EDM here in Minneapolis if event organizers and club owners host nights that get out of control in the way that Saturday did.

See Also: Shooting during Yo Gotti concert at Epic leaves one dead


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The CC Club brings back its old-school jukebox

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When we put together May's cover feature, "An Oral History of the CC Club," nearly everyone we talked to -- bar owners and bar flies, journalists and rock stars -- had something to say about the bar's legendary jukebox.

Some of their tales were eulogies. About two years ago, the bar's owners ditched their old model in favor of an electronic, internet-equipped TouchTunes version. Now, though, CC Club regulars have cause for a toast: At the end of August, the bar's new managers decided to bring a classic juke back.

See Also: An oral history of the CC Club jukebox

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