Will Shatner, the ultimate 'Iron Man'

220px-William_Shatner.jpg
So just when you'd managed to excise every last trace of the lava-bed crunch-munch of plodding, misanthropic metal mayhem that is The View from your cranium, shameless hambone thespian William Shatner crashes the random-heavy-metal-news-sweepstakes party with what's gotta be the most cringe-worthy version of Black Sabbath's "Iron Man" ever committed to tape.

Before Gimme Noise goes any further, you should probably just, um, click "Play" and leap headfirst into... this.

More »

New Goldy the Gopher promo video features unfortunate appropriation of Midnight Star

goldybadtouch.jpg
Because nothing says "Let's get ready for some college football!" like a vintage 1986 R&B jam, the University of Minnesota decided to pair up footage of Goldy the Gopher running around the TCF Stadium with the music video for Midnight Star's "Midas Touch" to create one of the weirdest promo videos in recent memory.

More »

Paul Simon sings 'The Sound of Silence' at Ground Zero

paulsimon-firstave-250.jpg
Photo by Steve Cohen
Paul Simon at First Avenue last May
It's been an onslaught of 9/11-related material this week, but here's the saddest/only video you really need to see: Paul Simon singing "The Sound of Silence" at Ground Zero yesterday as part of the 10-year anniversary memorial services honoring the lives lost in New York City.

More »

Prince tied into crazy 9-11 conspiracy

princepurpleraingrab.jpg
With chatter about 9/11 reaching a fever pitch this week, it was only a matter of time before someone started a crazy rumor connecting a celebrity to the attacks. And if a rumor's going to swirl that someone besides Nostradamus predicted the events of 9/11, well, yeah, it makes sense that somehow Prince would be involved.


More »

Tags:

Prince

Scott Gagner music video offers Super-8 glimpse into 1968 Minneapolis

Scott_Gagner_Press_Photo.jpg
Ever wish you could be transported back to the '60s to see how the pre-Woodstock wave of hipsters got down in the Twin Cities? Yeah, me too. So it was groovy and far out, man, to stumble on a music video by longtime drummer and new songwriter Scott Gagner, which features footage of a bunch of cool-looking cats tearing it up around Minneapolis and Minnetonka in 1968.

"It's comprised of Super-8 footage that my mom and dad shot when they were falling in love," Gagner told us in an email. "I hope you like it."

More »

Radiohead's full 'King of Limbs' session, From the Basement

radiohead-basement.jpg
Back in February, Radiohead released King of Limbs to international befuddlement -- do we like this? can we? I do! me too! -- that had zero effect on my neighbors' ability to play the record nonstop for at least a month (not mad). It might have been what you'd call a 'grower,' a word that people use to describe something their brains/tastes/cultural attachments aren't ready for until they are.

More »

5 Woodstock performances we're glad we missed

uzzle_woodstockMain2.jpg
The original Woodstock Music And Art Fair kicked off on this date in 1969, in a large farm located in Bethel, New York (which is technically about a half-hour southwest of Woodstock proper). And while much has been made and mythologized about the overwhelming feeling of peace and love that permeated through the 500,000+ sprawling masses that weekend, looking back on highlights from the festival has led me to some pretty poor musical performances (from both the smaller acts and the headliners) as well. And while, for most people, their overall experience at any music festival tends to be about far more than just the performances, ultimately that is what I'm drawn to and bother going to the large festivals for--great, memorable sets by bands that I love.

Here are some weak performances from the original Woodstock that I'm glad that I missed.

More »

Bob Mould 'covers' Sugar for A.V. Undercover

BobMould_NoahKalina.JPG
Photo by Noah Kalina
"This definitely counts as a cover... it's a Sugar cover," Bob Mould says through a smirk. "They were a great band!"

The former Husker Du and Suger frontman and current touring solo artist and memoirist has been glancing into the rearview mirror a lot these days, so it's no big surprise that he chose to "cover" one of his own songs ("If I Can't Change Your Mind," which he wrote during his time with Sugar) as part of the A.V. Club's ongoing Undercover series. "It's a well-written song," he says, speaking about himself in the third person. "It's a little bit like 'The Lion Sleeps Tonight,' a little derivative, but people liked it."

More »

tUnE-yArDs and the Roots melt brains on 'Late Night With Jimmy Fallon'

T-Y-Cedar-07-tUnE-yArDs-250.jpg
Photo by Erik Hess
tUnE-yArDs at the Cedar earlier this year
The Late Night With Jimmy Fallon show, which is musically hosted by groundbreaking live hip-hop crew the Roots, has made a habit out of bending the rules of typical late-show musical performances and allowing artists to perform whatever -- and however -- they'd like. Hell, Odd Future made a whole career out of their set-storming Fallon performance at the beginning of this year, and Justin Vernon of Bon Iver used his first of two Fallon performances this year to eschew his new material all together and play a medley of Bonnie Raitt and Donny Hathaway songs.

So it's welcome news, but by no means a surprise, that tUnE-yArDs used their spot on the Late Night With Jimmy Fallon show last night to collaborate with two members of the Roots -- and the resulting performance of tUnE-yArDs' "Gangsta" with special guests Questlove and Black Thought was one for the Fallon history books.

More »

MTV turns 30 today, watch the first 10 minutes of the station's existence

Mtvmoon.jpg
Today marks the 30th anniversary of the launch of MTV, which means we are all very, very old. And though many of us have long been able to answer the Trivial Pursuit question "What was the first music video played by MTV?" (answer: the Buggles' "Video Killed the Radio Star"), not many of us actually caught the launch of the station. It turns out that when the channel launched at 12:01 a.m. on August 1, 1981, the feed was only available to a few thousand people in northern New Jersey, so those first moments on air are more lore than a shared memory.

But now, thanks to the wonders of the glorious internet, those first snippets of the music channel-turned-industry empire's existence have been uploaded and preserved for us all to see.

More »
Loading...